Teaching to Change the World

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Teaching to Change the World

Teaching to Change the World

  • Author : Jeannie Oakes,Martin Lipton,Lauren Anderson,Jamy Stillman
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Social Science
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Pages : 516
  • Release Date : 2018-01-29

Teaching to Change the World is an up-to-the-moment, engaging, social justice-oriented introduction to education and teaching, and the challenges and opportunities they present. Both foundational and practical, the chapters are organized around conventional topics but in a way that consistently integrates a coherent story that explains why schools are as they are. Taking the position that a hopeful, democratic future depends on ensuring that all students learn, the text pays particular attention to inequalities associated with race, social class, language, gender, and other social categories and explores teachers’ role in addressing them. This thoroughly revised fifth edition remains a vital introduction to the profession for a new generation of teachers who seek to become purposeful, knowledgeable practitioners in our ever-changing educational landscape—for those teachers who see the potential for education to change the world. Features and Updates of the New Edition: • Fully updated Chapter 1, "The U.S. Schooling Dilemma," reflects our current state of education after the 2016 U.S. presidential election. • First-person observations from teachers, including first-year teachers, continue to offer vivid, authentic pictures of what teaching to change the world means and involves. • Additional coverage of the ongoing effects of Common Core highlights the heated public discourse around teaching and teachers, and charter schools. • Attention to diversity and inclusion is treated as integral to all chapters, woven throughout rather than tacked on as separate units. • "Digging Deeper" resources on the new companion website include concrete resources that current and future teachers can use in their classrooms. • "Tools for Critique" provides instructors and students questions, prompts, and activities aimed at encouraging classroom discussion and particularly engaging those students least familiar with the central tenets of social justice education.

This study explores two categories—empire and citizenship—that historians usually study separately. It does so with a unifying focus on racialization in the lives of outstanding women whose careers crossed national borders between 1880 and 1965. It puts an individual, intellectual, and female face on transnational phenomena.

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In The School Reform Landscape: Fear, Mythologies, and Lies, the authors take an in-depth and controversial look at school reform since the launch of Sputnik. They scrutinize school reform events, proposals, and policies from the last 60 years through the lens of critical social theory and examine the ongoing tensions between the need to keep a vibrant unitary system of public education and the ongoing assault by corporate and elite interests in creating a dual system. Some of events, proposals, and policies critiqued include the Sputnik myth, A Nation At Risk, No Child Left Behind, the lies of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, and other common reform schemes. The authors provide an evidence-based contrarian view of the free-market reform ideas and pierce the veil of the new reform policies to find that they are built not upon empirical evidence, but instead rest solidly on foundations of myth, fear, and lies. Ideas for a new set of reform policies, based on empirical evidence and supportive of a unitary, democratic system of education are presented.

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A master historian traces the flourishing of organized religion in Manhattan between the 1880s and the 1960s, revealing how faith adapted and thrived in the supposed capital of American secularism. In Gilded Age Manhattan, Catholic, Jewish, and Protestant leaders agonized over the fate of traditional religious practice amid chaotic and multiplying pluralism. Massive immigration, the anonymity of urban life, and modernity’s rationalism, bureaucratization, and professionalization seemingly eviscerated the sense of religious community. Yet fears of religion’s demise were dramatically overblown. Jon Butler finds a spiritual hothouse in the supposed capital of American secularism. By the 1950s Manhattan was full of the sacred. Catholics, Jews, and Protestants peppered the borough with sanctuaries great and small. Manhattan became a center of religious publishing and broadcasting and was home to august spiritual reformers from Reinhold Niebuhr to Abraham Heschel, Dorothy Day, and Norman Vincent Peale. A host of white nontraditional groups met in midtown hotels, while black worshippers gathered in Harlem’s storefront churches. Though denied the ministry almost everywhere, women shaped the lived religion of congregations, founded missionary societies, and, in organizations such as the Zionist Hadassah, fused spirituality and political activism. And after 1945, when Manhattan’s young families rushed to New Jersey and Long Island’s booming suburbs, they recreated the religious institutions that had shaped their youth. God in Gotham portrays a city where people of faith engaged modernity rather than floundered in it. Far from the world of “disenchantment” that sociologist Max Weber bemoaned, modern Manhattan actually birthed an urban spiritual landscape of unparalleled breadth, suggesting that modernity enabled rather than crippled religion in America well into the 1960s.

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Southern Baptists had long considered themselves a missionary people, but when, after World War II, they embarked on a dramatic expansion of missionary efforts, they confronted headlong the problem of racism. Believing that racism hindered their evangelical efforts, the Convention's full-time missionaries and mission board leaders attacked racism as unchristian, thus finding themselves at odds with the pervasive racist and segregationist ideologies that dominated the South. This progressive view of race stressed the biblical unity of humanity, encompassing all races and transcending specific ethnic divisions. In All According to God's Plan, Alan Scot Willis explores these beliefs and the chasm they created within the Convention. He shows how, in the post-World War II era, the most respected members of the Southern Baptists Convention publicly challenged the most dearly held ideologies of the white South.

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What does democracy look like? And when should we cause trouble to pursue it? Troublemakers fuses photography and history to demonstrate how racial and economic inequality gave rise to a decades-long struggle for justice in one American city. In dialogue with 275 of Art Shay’s photographs, Erik S. Gellman takes a new look at major developments in postwar US history: the Second Great Migration, “white flight,” and neighborhood and street conflicts, as well as shifting party politics and the growth of the carceral state. The result is a visual and written history that complicates—and even upends—the morality tales and popular memory of postwar freedom struggles. Shay himself was a “troublemaker,” seeking to unsettle society by illuminating truths that many middle-class, white, media, political, and businesspeople pretended did not exist. Shay served as a navigator in the US Army Air Forces during World War II, then took a position as a writer for Life Magazine. But soon after his 1948 move to Chicago, he decided to become a freelance photographer. Shay wandered the city photographing whatever caught his eye—and much did. His lens captured everything from private moments of rebellion to era-defining public movements, as he sought to understand the creative and destructive energies that propelled freedom struggles in the Windy City. Shay illuminated the pain and ecstasy that sprung up from the streets of Chicago, while Gellman reveals their collective impact on the urban fabric and on our national narrative. This collaboration offers a fresh and timely look at how social conflict can shape a city—and may even inspire us to make trouble today.

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The story of African Americans in Kentucky is as diverse and vibrant as the state's general history. The work of more than 150 writers, The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia is an essential guide to the black experience in the Commonwealth. The encyclopedia includes biographical sketches of politicians and community leaders as well as pioneers in art, science, and industry. Kentucky's impact on the national scene is registered in an array of notable figures, such as writers William Wells Brown and bell hooks, reformers Bessie Lucas Allen and Shelby Lanier Jr., sports icons Muhammad Ali and Isaac Murphy, civil rights leaders Whitney Young Jr. and Georgia Powers, and entertainers Ernest Hogan, Helen Humes, and the Nappy Roots. Featuring entries on the individuals, events, places, organizations, movements, and institutions that have shaped the state's history since its origins, the volume also includes topical essays on the civil rights movement, Eastern Kentucky coalfields, business, education, and women. For researchers, students, and all who cherish local history, The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia is an indispensable reference that highlights the diversity of the state's culture and history.

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Remembering Social Movements offers a comparative historical examination of the relations between social movements and collective memory. A detailed historiographical and theoretical review of the field introduces the reader to five key concepts to help guide analysis: repertoires of contention, historical events, generations, collective identities, and emotions. The book examines how social movements act to shape public memory as well as how memory plays an important role within social movements through 15 historical case studies, spanning labour, feminist, peace, anti-nuclear, and urban movements, as well as specific examples of ‘memory activism’ from the 19th century to the 21st century. These include transnational and explicitly comparative case studies, in addition to cases rooted in German, Australian, Indian, and American history, ensuring that the reader gains a real insight into the remembrance of social activism across the globe and in different contexts. The book concludes with an epilogue from a prominent Memory Studies scholar. Bringing together the previously disparate fields of Memory Studies and Social Movement Studies, this book systematically scrutinises the two-way relationship between memory and activism and uses case studies to ground students while offering analytical tools for the reader.

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A “remarkable” study of white Catholics and African Americans—and the dynamics between them in New York, Chicago, Boston, and other cities (The New York Times Book Review). Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations. In vivid portraits of parish life, John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between European-American Catholics and their African American neighbors. By tracing the transformation of a church, its people, and the nation, McGreevy illuminates the enormous impact of religious culture on modern American society. “Thorough, sensitive, and balanced.”—Kirkus Reviews “Parish Boundaries can take its place in the front ranks of the literature of urban race relations.”—The Washington Post "A prodigiously researched, gracefully written book distinguished especially by its seamless treatment of social and intellectual history."—American Historical Review “Parish Boundaries will fascinate historians and anyone interested in the historic connection between parish and race.”—Chicago Tribune

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The Upper Secondary School: A Comparative Survey presents the evolutionary stages through which educational systems develop as industrialism advances. This book discusses the various implications of the progress in the society whereby each has significance for education. Organized into 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the problems of upper secondary education and describes the actual and planned solutions in different countries. This text then investigates critically the progress that has been achieved and points out the ways in which the prospective of the present system is being under used. Other chapters consider the balance of general and special studies. This book discusses as well the system of further education and documents its achievements as well as its inefficiencies. The final chapter deals with the system of education in Spain, which has a low level of educational provision. This book is a valuable resource for sociologists, educators, and psychologists.

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Making novel use of the sociology of organizations and pragmatic philosophy, Irwin Miller sheds new light on the nature and evolution of both the Blues and American health care voluntarism and reform. He shows how Walter McNerney, one of the primary health policy shapers over the past forty years, used ideological and utopian rhetoric to help move Blue Cross into HMO development. This case study of institutional and leadership behavior uses firsthand interviews, archival documents, oral histories, and other materials to present an unusually concrete and readable narrative account as to how health care leaders engage in creative institution building, or health care reform.

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The most authoritative and comprehensive calendar reference for teachers--revised annually to keep readers up-to-date! Offers unique facts, important holidays, and major anniversaries in a handy day-by-day calendar format. New to this edition is a blog that will feature content from the book, fresh ideas for incorporating information into curriculum, and occasional guest entries by some of our other authors on the teacher resource list.

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Simple Justice is the definitive history of the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education and the epic struggle for racial equality in this country. Combining intensive research with original interviews with surviving participants, Richard Kluger provides the fullest possible view of the human and legal drama in the years before 1954, the cumulative assaults on the white power structure that defended segregation, and the step-by-step establishment of a team of inspired black lawyers that could successfully challenge the law. Now, on the fiftieth anniversary of the unanimous Supreme Court decision that ended legal segregation, Kluger has updated his work with a new final chapter covering events and issues that have arisen since the book was first published, including developments in civil rights and recent cases involving affirmative action, which rose directly out of Brown v. Board of Education.

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An emphasis on education has long been a salient feature of the Jewish experience, yet the majority of historians of east European Jewish society treat educational institutions and pursuits as merely a reflection of the surrounding culture. The essays in this volume seek to address this gap by presenting education as an active and potent force for change, highlighting the interrelationship between Jewish educational endeavours, the Jewish community, and external economic, political, and social forces.

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This Brief reviews the past, present, and future use of school corporal punishment in the United States, a practice that remains legal in 19 states as it is constitutionally permitted according to the U.S. Supreme Court. As a result of school corporal punishment, nearly 200,000 children are paddled in schools each year. Most Americans are unaware of this fact or the physical injuries sustained by countless school children who are hit with objects by school personnel in the name of discipline. Therefore, Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools begins by summarizing the legal basis for school corporal punishment and trends in Americans’ attitudes about it. It then presents trends in the use of school corporal punishment in the United States over time to establish its past and current prevalence. It then discusses what is known about the effects of school corporal punishment on children, though with so little research on this topic, much of the relevant literature is focused on parents’ use of corporal punishment with their children. It also provides results from a policy analysis that examines the effect of state-level school corporal punishment bans on trends in juvenile crime. It concludes by discussing potential legal, policy, and advocacy avenues for abolition of school corporal punishment at the state and federal levels as well as summarizing how school corporal punishment is being used and what its potential implications are for thousands of individual students and for the society at large. As school corporal punishment becomes more and more regulated at the state level, Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools serves an essential guide for policymakers and advocates across the country as well as for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students.

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This book redefines the origins of the women's rights campaigns in Britain. Contrary to the existing historiography, which argues that the Victorian Feminist movement began in the 1850s, this book, by bringing to light a wealth of unused sources, demonstrates that a vibrant community existed during the 1830s and 1840s. Previously neglected, this remarkable group of writers and reformers established both the ideologies and personnel network which provided the foundations of the women's rights campaigns of the coming decades.

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I felt like a caged animal.' This damning indictment by Dame Dorothy Tutin of her treatment in hospital at the age of 70 propelled her daughter Amanda Waring into a crusade to ensure that all older people in care are treated with kindness, compassion and dignity. Amanda is now a widely respected filmmaker, public speaker and teacher specialising in dignified care of the elderly. The Heart of Care distils her experiences, covering such topics as : the transition from home or hospital to care home ; creating person-centred, compassionate care homes; coping with dementia ; creativity and activity in care ; honouring and celebrating our elders ; maintaining spiritual and emotional care The Heart of Care encourages all carers to look into themselves and question their attitudes, prejudices and behaviour. Combining anecdote, reminiscence, practical advice and role-model exercises that really work, Amanda Waring gently motivates and educates us all to be better carers. Acknowledging that the path can be hard, she includes tips and advice to keep carers engaged and motivated when the going gets tough. As our population rapidly ages and more and more people find themselves researching options for care of the elderly, and as lurid and disturbing stories about substandard care hit the headlines on a daily basis, we all need to look closely at these issues. Essential reading for all who care for an elderly person, whether stranger or loved one, The Heart of Care promotes respect for the dignity and intrinsic worth of others, regardless of age or disability.

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Named a Best Art Book of 2017 by the New York Times and Artforum In South of Pico Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the past to consider real and imagined futures. She also attends to these artists' relationships with gallery and museum culture and the establishment of black-owned arts spaces. With South of Pico, Jones expands the understanding of the histories of black arts and creativity in Los Angeles and beyond.

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Americans have long recognized that investments in public education contribute to the common good, enhancing national prosperity and supporting stable families, neighborhoods, and communities. Education is even more critical today, in the face of economic, environmental, and social challenges. Today's children can meet future challenges if their schooling and informal learning activities prepare them for adult roles as citizens, employees, managers, parents, volunteers, and entrepreneurs. To achieve their full potential as adults, young people need to develop a range of skills and knowledge that facilitate mastery and application of English, mathematics, and other school subjects. At the same time, business and political leaders are increasingly asking schools to develop skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and self-management - often referred to as "21st century skills." Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century describes this important set of key skills that increase deeper learning, college and career readiness, student-centered learning, and higher order thinking. These labels include both cognitive and non-cognitive skills- such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, effective communication, motivation, persistence, and learning to learn. 21st century skills also include creativity, innovation, and ethics that are important to later success and may be developed in formal or informal learning environments. This report also describes how these skills relate to each other and to more traditional academic skills and content in the key disciplines of reading, mathematics, and science. Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century summarizes the findings of the research that investigates the importance of such skills to success in education, work, and other areas of adult responsibility and that demonstrates the importance of developing these skills in K-16 education. In this report, features related to learning these skills are identified, which include teacher professional development, curriculum, assessment, after-school and out-of-school programs, and informal learning centers such as exhibits and museums.

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The Statesman's Yearbook , now in a new, enlarged format, contains profiles of every country in the world and includes 20% new content. All print purchases now receive online access at no extra cost, with a single-user licence giving access to the full text online, updated regularly and fully searchable. For queries - [email protected]

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This study reveals how historian Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) used the black press and modern public relations techniques to popularize black history during the first half of the twentieth century. Explanations for Woodson's success with the modern black history movement usually include his training, deep-rooted principles, and single-minded determination. Often overlooked, however, is Woodson's skillful use of newspapers in developing and executing a public education campaign built on truth, accuracy, fairness, and education. Burnis R. Morris explains how Woodson attracted mostly favorable news coverage for his history movement due to his deep understanding of the newspapers" business and editorial models as well as his public relations skills, which helped him merge the interests of the black press with his cause. Woodson's publicity tactics, combined with access to the audiences granted him by the press, enabled him to drive the black history movement--particularly observance of Negro History Week and fundraising activities. Morris analyzes Woodson's periodicals, newspaper articles, letters, and other archived documents describing Woodson's partnership with the black press and his role as a publicist. This rarely explored side of Woodson, who was often called the "Father of Black History," reintroduces Woodson's lost image as a leading cultural icon who used his celebrity in multiple roles as an opinion journalist, newsmaker, and publicist of black history to bring veneration to a disrespected subject. During his active professional career, 1915-1950, Woodson merged his interests and the interests of the black newspapers. His cause became their cause.

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Known for being visually engaging, CRIM 3CE is part of our 4 LTR Press suite of products which is developed based on student and faculty feedback. The new edition is now available with access to MindTap, a digital learning solution that provides content aligned with the book and allows students to track their progress as they move through the program. This complete hybrid solution is designed to accommodate the diverse learning style of today’s students in the introduction to criminology course. CRIM 3CE provides students with the tools they need to understand the different strains of criminological theory and their different applications to addressing real-world problems.

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Introduction Chapter One "So Many People": Ways of Seeing Class Differences in Schooling Chapter Two The Origins of Educational Inequality in Ontario Chapter Three Streaming in the Elementary School Chapter Four Streaming in the Secondary School Chapter Five Unstacking the Deck: A New Deal for Our Schools Abstract Bibliography

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"Democracy and Education" by John Dewey. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

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Research Methods in Education introduces research methods as an integrated set of techniques for investigating questions about the educational world. This lively, innovative text helps students connect technique and substance, appreciate the value of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and make ethical research decisions. It weaves actual research "stories" into the presentation of research topics, and it emphasizes validity, authenticity, and practical significance as overarching research goals. The text is divided into three sections: Foundations of Research (five chapters), Research Design and Data Collection (seven chapters), and Analyzing and Reporting Data (three chapters). This tripartite conceptual framework honors traditional quantitative approaches while reflecting the growing popularity of qualitative studies, mixed method designs, and school-based techniques. This approach provides a comprehensive, conceptually unified, and well-written introduction to the exciting but complex field of educational research.

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How the history of Texas illuminates America's post–Civil War past Tracing the intersection of religion, race, and power in Texas from Reconstruction through the rise of the Religious Right and the failed presidential bid of Governor Rick Perry, Rough Country illuminates American history since the Civil War in new ways, demonstrating that Texas's story is also America’s. In particular, Robert Wuthnow shows how distinctions between "us" and “them” are perpetuated and why they are so often shaped by religion and politics. Early settlers called Texas a rough country. Surviving there necessitated defining evil, fighting it, and building institutions in the hope of advancing civilization. Religion played a decisive role. Today, more evangelical Protestants live in Texas than in any other state. They have influenced every presidential election for fifty years, mobilized powerful efforts against abortion and same-sex marriage, and been a driving force in the Tea Party movement. And religion has always been complicated by race and ethnicity. Drawing from memoirs, newspapers, oral history, voting records, and surveys, Rough Country tells the stories of ordinary men and women who struggled with the conditions they faced, conformed to the customs they knew, and on occasion emerged as powerful national leaders. We see the lasting imprint of slavery, public executions, Jim Crow segregation, and resentment against the federal government. We also observe courageous efforts to care for the sick, combat lynching, provide for the poor, welcome new immigrants, and uphold liberty of conscience. A monumental and magisterial history, Rough Country is as much about the rest of America as it is about Texas.

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This open access edited volume is a comparative effort to discern the short-term educational impact of the covid-19 pandemic on students, teachers and systems in Brazil, Chile, Finland, Japan, Mexico, Norway, Portugal, Russia, Singapore, Spain, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. One of the first academic comparative studies of the educational impact of the pandemic, the book explains how the interruption of in person instruction and the variable efficacy of alternative forms of education caused learning loss and disengagement with learning, especially for disadvantaged students. Other direct and indirect impacts of the pandemic diminished the ability of families to support children and youth in their education. For students, as well as for teachers and school staff, these included the economic shocks experienced by families, in some cases leading to food insecurity and in many more causing stress and anxiety and impacting mental health. Opportunity to learn was also diminished by the shocks and trauma experienced by those with a close relative infected by the virus, and by the constrains on learning resulting from students having to learn at home, where the demands of schoolwork had to be negotiated with other family necessities, often sharing limited space. Furthermore, the prolonged stress caused by the uncertainty over the resolution of the pandemic and resulting from the knowledge that anyone could be infected and potentially lose their lives, created a traumatic context for many that undermined the necessary focus and dedication to schoolwork. These individual effects were reinforced by community effects, particularly for students and teachers living in communities where the multifaceted negative impacts resulting from the pandemic were pervasive. This is an open access book.

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„Dieses Buch ist nicht nur Kampfschrift, sondern auch eine fulminante wissenschaftliche Studie. [...] ‚Die Bestrafung der Armen’ ist keine Polemik, sondern längst Realität. Das gezeigt zu haben, ist Wacquants Verdienst.“ Bayerischer Rundfunk Loïc Wacquant analysiert die öffentliche Mobilmachung zum Thema „Sicherheit“ und die Verschärfung von Strafpraxen als Maßnahmen zur Marginalisierung und Normalisierung unterer Klassen sowie Ablenkungsmanöver in Bezug auf die soziale Frage.

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Methods in Educational Research Methods in Educational Research is designed to prepare students for the real world of educational research. It focuses on scientifically-based methods, school accountability, and the professional demands of the twenty-first century, empowering researchers to take an active role in conducting research in their classrooms, districts, and the greater educational community. Like the first edition, this edition helps students, educators, and researchers develop a broad and deep understanding of research methodologies. It includes substantial new content on the impact of No Child Left Behind legislation, school reform, quantitative and qualitative methodologies, logic modeling, action research, and other areas. Special features to assist the teaching and learning processes include vignettes illustrating research tied to practice, suggested readings at the end of each chapter, and discussion questions to reinforce chapter content. Praise for the Previous Edition "A new attempt to make this subject more relevant and appealing to students. Most striking is how useful this book is because it is really grounded in educational research. It is very well written and quite relevant for educational researchers or for the student hoping to become one." -PsycCRITIQUES/American Psychological Association "I applaud the authors for their attempt to cover a wide range of material. The straightforward language of the book helps make the material understandable for readers." -Journal of MultiDisciplinary Evaluation

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The anthrax incidents following the 9/11 terrorist attacks put the spotlight on the nation's public health agencies, placing it under an unprecedented scrutiny that added new dimensions to the complex issues considered in this report. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century reaffirms the vision of Healthy People 2010, and outlines a systems approach to assuring the nation's health in practice, research, and policy. This approach focuses on joining the unique resources and perspectives of diverse sectors and entities and challenges these groups to work in a concerted, strategic way to promote and protect the public's health. Focusing on diverse partnerships as the framework for public health, the book discusses: The need for a shift from an individual to a population-based approach in practice, research, policy, and community engagement. The status of the governmental public health infrastructure and what needs to be improved, including its interface with the health care delivery system. The roles nongovernment actors, such as academia, business, local communities and the media can play in creating a healthy nation. Providing an accessible analysis, this book will be important to public health policy-makers and practitioners, business and community leaders, health advocates, educators and journalists.

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為什麼我們努力工作,沒有換得快樂, 反而像是關進了生產力牢籠裡? ──我們真的不必時時刻刻對自己喊加油 「追求生產力」讓我們有安全感,但誰說凡事「努力」一定不會錯? 小心!它可能就是令你過度耗損的枷鎖! ◆Check!以下症狀你有幾項: ‧認為該將清醒的時間全部投入有生產力的事,才不算浪費? ‧常常把工作帶回家,休假總是用不完,越積越多? ‧一閒下來就心慌、有罪惡感?老想找事做,填滿行程? ‧下班時間仍忍不住打開電子信箱回信,在工作群組上二十四小時待命? ‧有各種時間管理或記錄APP,以求提升工作、學習、飲食、運動、作息的效率? #二十世紀經濟學家凱因斯曾預言2030年人們將一週只需工作15小時# →如今我們有無人機、電腦、網路、洗碗機、掃地機器人,為什麼我們還是忙碌不堪? #曾經,有閒暇時間是高收入階級的身分象徵# →為什麼現代社會中忙碌反倒取代休閒成為「榮譽勳章」,成為成功人士的地位標誌? 你我都被困在要求不停提升效率的文化體制裡 不知不覺努力過了頭,沒活出更幸福的人生,還自傷而不自知 →為什麼我們閒不下來? 作者瑟列斯特.赫莉在本書中提出,身在過度重視生產力的文化中,我們扭曲了對時間的感知:相信「時間就是金錢」,不容浪費,空閒時間開始令人覺得有壓力,人們打從心底擔憂他們沒賺到的錢;而且,當人越是有錢,時間就越昂貴。我們因而漸漸忽視「閒暇」的重要性,也一點一滴失去創造力、同理心以及歸屬感…… →「追求時時刻刻都有生產力」是有害的 我們相信只要努力就會有收穫,習慣用各種清單、表格、APP安排工作與私人行程,記錄飲食與運動等成效;結果卻行程滿檔、一閒就心慌,不時擔心自己的一切努力是否還不夠,甚至,即使已「能者過勞」,仍質疑是自己效率不彰……我們崇尚效率,執迷於快速解決問題,卻沒時間好好思考真正的目標:什麼是我們想過的理想生活? →停下來!別讓「效率」綁架你的人生 作者從自身過度努力的經歷出發,對工作的意義提出質問,並從歷史和社會學觀點進行考察,描繪出勤奮的努力文化如何被形塑而成;更援引神經科學、演化生物學的研究,明確指出人類的大腦需要放空、沉澱,才能真正地充電、運作。 本書更校正了我們對時間的認知,給予「空閒時間」正確的評價。作者強調,想充分利用每一分鐘時間的欲望,導致我們執迷於快速解決問題,但「效率」只是手段,不該本末倒置,而迷失了真正的目標:過上更幸福的生活,創造出人際關係優先於生產力的文化。 →幸福的生活是在勞動與閒暇之間保持平衡 即使改善自我是件好事,但用不著時時刻刻想辦法要讓自己變得更好。唯有戒除對效率與生產力的成癮,才能達到真正的身心平衡。對此,書中也提供取回生活主導權的六項建議,幫助你停止不必要的自我消耗。當我們容許自己擁有「閒暇」,放下對效率和生產力的執迷,將更有創意與洞察力,也將更能與人建立幸福的歸屬感。 ◆打破生產力迷思: ‧努力工作更有生產力?→過度工作反而影響工作表現! ‧努力工作能賺更多錢?→獲利未必真的反應在你的薪水上、進到你的口袋! ‧努力工作有助於升遷?→調查顯示,休假天數多的人比起休假更少的人更有可能加薪! ‧薪水比較高未必比較快樂。在滿足基本需求後,更能令人快樂的,是閒暇的時間。 ‧科技未必使真正提升效率,而是創造出「有效率的錯覺」。 ‧追求效率可能讓人失去變通與適應的彈性,變得更脆弱。 ◆邁向身心平衡的解決之途: ‧培養需要大量時間的嗜好:繡個不賣人的十字繡、做好幾隻天竺鼠車車的羊毛氈。 ‧提升「時間知覺」:清楚自己的時間規劃,能更感受到時間的充裕。 ‧建立真正的人際連結:社交接觸是人的天性,能讓你感覺更舒服和減輕壓力。 ‧隨機行善:就算只是小事一樁,也能觸發腦內啡的釋放,有助於阻斷疼痛和產生欣快感。 作者簡介│ 瑟列斯特・赫莉(Celeste Headlee) 得獎的新聞記者和專業演講者,著有暢銷書《同理心對話》(We Need to Talk)和《讓你的心聲被聽見》(Heard Mentality)。在她二十年的公共廣播電臺職涯中,曾擔任喬治亞公共廣播電臺(Georgia Public Radio)節目On Second Thought的執行製作,並主持國家公共廣播電臺(National Public Radio)的Tell Me More、Talk of the Nation、All Things Considered、1A和Weekend Edition等節目。她也曾替PRI和WNYC共同主持全國性晨間新聞節目The Takeaway,以及主持World Channel的二○一二年總統大選報導。瑟列斯特的TED演說分享了十種營造更美好對話經驗的方法,迄今超過兩千萬觀看次數。 瑟列斯特目前擔任procon.org和Listen First Project的顧問,並獲頒二○一九年媒體改革家獎(Media Changemaker Award)。瑟列斯特與藝術家Masud Olufani一起主持美國公共電視台(PBS)的Retro Report,是自二○一九年開播、每週一集的新系列節目。她也是播客節目Scene on Radio第三季節目Men的共同主持人。她的文章和洞見見於《今日秀》(Today Show)電視節目和各種新聞媒體,包括《時代》雜誌、《今日心理學》(Psychology Today)、《Essence》、《Elle》、《Parade》等雜誌,以及BuzzFeed和Salon等網站。她也於各大公司、會議和大學中進行過上百場演講,包括蘋果公司、Google、聯合航空、杜克大學(Duke University)、Chobani公司和ESPN頻道。 譯者簡介│ 林金源 專職譯者,嗜好文史,優遊於花鳥蟲魚的世界,譯作有《情緒之書》、《樹的智慧》、《伊斯坦堡三城記》、《筆尖上的世界史》、《轉角遇見經濟學》、《不費力的力量》、《最受歡迎的心理學故事》、《改變設計的100個概念》等。 賜教信箱:[email protected]

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With this significant new work, Larry Cuban provides a unique and insightful perspective on the bridging of the long-standing and well-known gap between teachers and administrators. Drawing on the literature of the field as well as personal experience, Cuban recognizes the enduring structural relationship within school organizations inherited by teachers, principals, and superintendents, and calls for a renewal of their sense of common purpose regarding the role of schooling in a democratic society. Cuban analyzes the dominant images (moral and technical), roles (instructional, managerial, and political), and contexts (classroom, school, and district) within which teachers, principals, and superintendents have worked over the last century. He concludes that when these powerful images and roles are wedded to the structural conditions in which schooling occurs, “managerial behavior” results, thus narrowing the potential for more thoughtful, effective, and appropriate leadership. Cuban then turns to consider this situation with respect to the contemporary movement for school reform, identifying significant concerns both for policymakers and practitioners. This honest, thought-provoking book by a leading scholar, writer, and practitioner in the field represents an invaluable resource—an insightful introduction for those just entering the field and a fresh, new perspective for those long-familiar with its complexities. Cuban’s ethnographic approach to the development of his own career and viewpoint, as well as his highly readable style, make this a work of lasting value.

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This masterpiece by Engels reflects his views on the plight of labour classes in England. It is based on his in-depth research and parliamentary reports. In a factual and analytic manner he has voiced his support for fundamental human rights. It is an emphatic protest against the barbarianism of capitalism and industrialization. A prototypical opus!

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Okonkwo is the greatest warrior alive, famous throughout West Africa. But when he accidentally kills a clansman, things begin to fall apart. Then Okonkwo returns from exile to find missionaries and colonial governors have arrived in the village. With his world thrown radically off-balance he can only hurtle towards tragedy. Chinua Achebe's stark novel reshaped both African and world literature. This arresting parable of a proud but powerless man witnessing the ruin of his people begins Achebe's landmark trilogy of works chronicling the fate of one African community, continued in Arrow of God and No Longer at Ease.

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A fully-revised and updated new edition of a concise and insightful socio-historical analysis of the Cuban revolution, and the course it took over five and a half decades. Now available in a fully-revised second edition, including new material to add to the book’s coverage of Cuba over the past decade under Raul Castro All of the existing chapters have been updated to reflect recent scholarship Balances social and historical insight into the revolution with economic and political analysis extending into the twenty-first century Juxtaposes U.S. and Cuban perspectives on the historical impact of the revolution, engaging and debunking the myths and preconceptions surrounding one of the most formative political events of the twentieth century Incorporates more student-friendly features such as a timeline and glossary

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Publisher's Note: Products purchased from Third Party sellers are not guaranteed by the publisher for quality, authenticity, or access to any online entitlements included with the product. Goldfrank’s is the premier toxicology textbook that should be in every emergency department or poison center library. Whether you are a student, resident, or faculty, there is something here for you. If you are a toxicology fellow or poison specialist studying for your boards, this is your go-to book. I highly recommend this work... —The Journal of Emergency Medicine The best edition yet of the landmark text in medical toxicology A Doody’s Core Title for 2020! Covering every aspect of poison management, this indispensable case-based resource has been thoroughly refreshed to deliver evidence-based principles viewed through the lens of an active bedside clinical practice. In no other reference will you find such a diverse roster of esteemed editors and authors who deliver expert insights into every type of toxicologic emergency, whether due to substance abuse or exposure to toxins. Fully referenced and supported by a cohesive organization and full-color format, Goldfrank’s begins with a historical perspective on medical toxicology principles and the general approach to the patient. It then progresses to the fundamental principles of medical toxicology, encompassing biochemical and molecular concepts; the effect of xenobiotics on vital organs and body systems; and toxicologic principles in special populations. The Eleventh Edition of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies is the most rigorous volume to date, driven by a precise analysis of the latest medical literature and complex cases designed to facilitate differential diagnosis. New to this Edition: • Additional cases and “Special Considerations” chapters designed to enhance clinical decision-making and patient outcomes • New “Antidotes in Depth” provides timely, critical information on toxicologic treatment strategies • New content on toxicogenomics explores its increasingly important role in predictive toxicology • Chapter-ending bulleted summaries of key points • Updated coverage of synthetics such as “K2” • Revised chapters on medical, clinical, and chemical toxicology include updated insights on poison emergencies, treatment strategies, and risk assessment tools

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Colonial America holds friendship, hardship, and love for a bold woman in this classic historical romance from the bestselling author of Green Darkness. In 1631 Elizabeth Winthrop, newly widowed with an infant daughter, set sail for the New World. Against a background of rigidity and conformity she dared to befriend Anne Hutchinson at the moment of her banishment from the Massachusetts Bay Colony; dared to challenge a determined army captain bent on the massacre of her friends the Siwanoy Indians; and, above all, dared to love a man as her heart and her whole being commanded. And so, as a response to this almost unmatched courage and vitality, Governor John Winthrop came to refer to this woman in the historical records of the time as his “unregenerate niece.” Anya Seton’s riveting historical novel portrays the fortitude, humiliation, and ultimate triumph of the Winthrop woman, who believed in a concept of happiness transcending that of her own day. “The Winthrop Woman is that rare literary accomplishment—living history. Really good fictionalized history [like this] often gives closer reality to a period than do factual records.”—Chicago Tribune “A rich and panoramic narrative full of gusto, sentimentality and compassion. It is bound to give much enjoyment and a good many thrills.”—Times Literary Supplement (UK) “Abundant and juicy entertainment.”—New York Times

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The fascinating, true story of the world's deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight. An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American soldiers were killed by the 1918 flu as were killed in battle during World War I. And no area of the globe was safe. Eskimos living in remote outposts in the frozen tundra were sickened and killed by the flu in such numbers that entire villages were wiped out. Scientists have recently rediscovered shards of the flu virus frozen in Alaska and preserved in scraps of tissue in a government warehouse. Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. Delving into the history of the flu and previous epidemics, detailing the science and the latest understanding of this mortal disease, Kolata addresses the prospects for a great epidemic recurring, and, most important, what can be done to prevent it.

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