An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen

Read or download online An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen ebook full in format Pdf, ePub, Kindle, and many more. An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen written by Liz Freeland, published by Kensington Books on 2020-02-25 with 304 pages for you to read. An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen is one from many Fiction books that available for free in the amazon kindle unlimited, click Get Book to start reading and download books online free now. With Kindle Unlimited Free trial, you can read as many books as you want today.

An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen

An Orphan of Hell's Kitchen

  • Author : Liz Freeland
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Fiction
  • Publisher : Kensington Books
  • Pages : 304
  • Release Date : 2020-02-25

In 1914, Hell’s Kitchen is an apt name for New York City’s grittiest neighborhood, as one of the city’s first policewomen, Louise Faulk, is about to discover when the death of a young prostitute leads her on a grim journey through the district’s darkest corners . . . Filthy, dangerous, and deadly—Hell’s Kitchen is no place for a lady, but Louise Faulk is no ordinary woman. The amateur investigator turned rookie policewoman is investigating the death of young prostitute, Ruthie, who leaves behind a baby boy. Although detectives are quick to declare it a suicide, Louise is less certain after she discovers clues implying murder while attempting to find a caretaker for Ruthie’s orphaned son. Uncovering the truth won’t be easy, especially since Louise is struggling to make a name for herself amid the boys’ club of the New York City Police Department. But Ruthie’s case keeps tugging at Louise, luring her beyond the slums’ drawn curtains and tenement doors, into an undercover investigation that often seems to conceal more than it reveals. Louise is convinced Ruthie’s secrets got her killed, but can she prove it before they catch up to her too?

It is the early twentieth century, and aspiring journalist Howard Andrews has been nurturing a love affair with Eleanor Arlingtonpartly in his own imaginationsince he was fifteen years old. But when Ellie tells Howie she is dropping out of college because her father has lost their family farm, he can only hope that they will be together one day. But even as the country prepares for a seemingly inevitable world war, Howard proposes. It seems all his dreams are about to come true. By the spring of 1917, the world has turned inside out. With a little more than three months to go before their wedding, Congress declares war, changing everything for the young couple. In a short span, Howard signs up for artillery school and seals his commitment with Eleanor during what turns out to be a beautiful, military wedding ceremony. Just two days later, he must report for duty and leave his new wife behind. Little does he know that a tiny life has already begun to grow inside Eleanor. In this historical tale based on true events, a father and son soon discover that the consequences of warand the peace that followswill pursue both of them for much longer than they ever imagined.

GET BOOK

The American writer--both real and fictitious, famous and obscure--has traditionally been situated on the margins of society, an outsider looking in. From The Great Gatsby's Nick Carraway to the millions of bloggers today, writers are generally seen as onlookers documenting the human condition. Yet their own collective story has largely gone untold. Tracing the role of the writer in the United States over the last century, this book describes how those who use language as a creative medium have held a special place in our collective imagination.

GET BOOK

The Mallone sisters look Irish, but don’t let their blue eyes fool you. “It’s all in how you say it,” their grandma Anona proudly says. “Ma-llone is Irish. Mal-lon-e is Italian.” Growing up Italian in the 1920s, in Hell’s Kitchen, an Irish enclave, requires toughness, thrift, and a calculating mind―even for the three beautiful Mallone sisters. And when their baby sister Gracie is swept off her feet by no-good Frankie Merelli, Helen and Mary will do anything to make sure Grace gets the life she deserves, even if that means going after her husband… The Sisters Mallone is a black comedy about the power of sisterhood and the importance of family―and family connections. Through irrepressible characters, and infectious and suspenseful writing, The Sisters Mallone reveals the American immigrant’s dream―with a twist.

GET BOOK

This absorbing study of early 20th Century American Culture interprets the anarchic absurdity of slapstick movies as a form of collective anxiety dream, their fantastical images and illogical gags expressing the unconscious wishes and fears of the modern age, in a way that foreshadows the concerns of our own celebrity-obsessed consumer culture.

GET BOOK

From the bestselling author of Jupiter's Travels and Dreaming of Jupiter comes an entertaining and inspiring new journey round Britain. Having crisscrossed the globe twice, Ted returns to the British Isles to rediscover the country of his youth. The result is a revealing portrait of modern Britain and a witty and affectionate journey back to the past, when Ted would hitchhike across the country visiting friends (and girlfriends). He returns to the site of his old school with its astonishing war time history and visits familiar haunts where he did his National Service and got his first job in newspapers. He also visits less-familiar places. Some inspire him (Winchester Cathedral). Others defeat him (a tax office in Nottingham). As he rolls through the Isles, he discovers that a great deal has changed: busier roads, bureaucracy and, worst of all, the dreaded 'Sat Nav'. But there is also much to celebrate and enjoy along the way. Packed with fascinating stories, extraordinary encounters and glorious depictions of the British countryside, Rolling through the Isles takes the reader on an unforgettable trip with a celebrated adventurer and writer.

GET BOOK

The Road Movie Book is the first comprehensive study of an enduring but ever-changing Hollywood genre, its place in American culture, and its legacy to world cinema. The road and the cinema both flourished in the twentieth century, as technological advances brought motion pictures to a mass audience and the mass produced automobile opened up the road to the ordinary American. When Jean Baudrillard equated modern American culture with 'space, speed, cinema, technology' he could just as easily have added that the road movie is its supreme emblem. The contributors explore how the road movie has confronted and represented issues of nationhood, sexuality, gender, class and race. They map the generic terrain of the road movie, trace its evolution on American television as well as on the big screen from the 1930s through the 1980s, and, finally, consider road movies that go off the road, departing from the US landscape or travelling on the margins of contemporary American culture. Movies discussed include: * Road classics such as It Happened One Night, The Grapes of Wrath, The Wizard of Oz and the Bob Hope-Bing Crosby Road to films * 1960's reworkings of the road movie in Easy Rider and Bonnie and Clyde * Russ Meyer's road movies: from Motorpsycho! to Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill! * Contemporary hits such as Paris Texas, Rain Man, Natural Born Killers and Thelma and Louise * The road movie, Australian style, from Mad Max to the Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.

GET BOOK

An Orphan in New York City is about survival. During the Great Depression families who suffered loss of income, loss of health, and loss of life sought frantically for ways to survive. Social Security, Housing and Urban Development, Public Assistance, and Public Health programs available today were limited or non-existent back then. All extended family members helped out as much as they could. When this was not enough, the only choice was to break up the family. Benevolent Jews had established orphanages to care for children left homeless or in poverty. The largest of these orphanages was the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, better known as the HOA or The Home, located between 136th to 138th Streets on Amsterdam Avenue across from the Lewisohn Stadium of the City College of New York City. From 1929 to 1939 the HOA housed more than one thousand boys and girls at a time. The Hebrew Orphan Asylum was referred to as a city within a city as it was basically self-contained. Not only where there the essentials of residential life-- dormitories, a kitchen, a dining room, an infirmary, a dental clinic, and a laundry--but also a public school 192, a synagogue, and a religious school. Then too there were a bakery, a shoe shop, a tailor shop, a barber shop, a clothing store, a candy store, a woodworking room, a sewing room, a photography studio and darkroom, a boys scout room, a band room, a choir room, athletic fields and playgrounds. There was a Reception House, the Main Building, the Warner Brothers Gymnasium (state of the art at that time), and buildings for boilers for heating. It had its own transportation system and a fire engine. There were military bands and drill squads, fraternities and sororities, as well as baseball, basketball, and football teams that competed with other orphanages and the junior varsity at City College. Orphans, half orphans, and children from broken families began their shared institutional lives at the Reception House where they were isolated for two weeks to assure they did not bring any contagious disease or illness into the institution. The author was one of those with a family destroyed by alcoholism and poverty who had to leave his family at the age of nine and begin an orphan's life. He writes: "Having seen, from my top-floor perch in the Reception House, children who were playing on the huge field below, and having listened to the marching band and watched the military drills, I was looking forward to moving to the Main Building. But when I finally got there I felt lost in the labyrinth of hallways and doorways, and among the masses of children who were coming and going. Outside, in the courtyard, were more than 100 children talking, shouting and playing together. One of my first memories there is of hearing a short rotund man suddenly shout above that babble of voices: "All Steeeeeeeeeel!" All Still. What that meant only became clear when, as I watched, most of the children froze in their places and stopped talking. One child did not freeze. The man with the powerful voice strode over to him and slapped him so hard across the face that the child fell down.In the years that I would be in the orphanage, that and similar examples made me obey the "All Still!" and always appear to be following commands, rules, and regulations, even when I wasn't obeying. What I witnessed there, day after day, also reinforced my hopeless and helpless feeling that there were immense forces beyond my control: my father's rage, my separation, my placement in an institutional environment, and the subsequent abuse in that environment. I wept within myself, and there was no adult at the institution to comfort me, not the first day nor the last." For his own healing, Dr. Siegel has written a book about his decade during the depression years in the Hebrew Orphan Asylum

GET BOOK

In this new collection of reviews and essays, Jonathan Rosenbaum focuses on the political and social dynamics of the contemporary movie scene. Rosenbaum, widely regarded as the most gifted contemporary American commentator on the cinema, explores the many links between film and our ideological identities as individuals and as a society. Readers will find revealing examinations of, for example, racial stereotyping in the debates surrounding Do the Right Thing, key films from Africa, China, Japan, and Taiwan, Hollywood musicals and French serials, and the cultural amnesia accompanying cinematic treatments of the Russian Revolution, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War. From Schindler's List, Star Wars, Pulp Fiction, Forrest Gump, The Piano, and Ace Ventura: Pet Detective to the maverick careers of Orson Welles, Jacques Tati, Nicholas Ray, Chantal Akerman, Todd Haynes, and Andrei Tarkovsky, Rosenbaum offers a polemically pointed survey that makes clear the high stakes involved in every aspect of filmmaking and filmgoing.

GET BOOK

Liverpool, 1936. Molly Penelope Hardwick has been abandoned in Haisborough Orphanage. Desperate to discover her background, she befriends another orphan, Lenny Smith. Together they sneak out to roam the city of Liverpool, and hatch plans for their escape. But when Molly is forced to leave the orphanage, Lenny has no idea where she’s gone. And when war is declared, he soon forgets about his childhood best pal to focus on his posting with the RAF in Scrimpton. What Lenny doesn’t know is that Molly is desperate to join the war effort, and with her sights set on joining the WAAF, chances are they will see each other again. But will things ever be the same after all this time?

GET BOOK

As Maryanne grows up during the 1940s in Philadelphia, life is far from ordinary. When she is just five years old, her mother passes away. After Maryanne’s father proves to be incapable of caring for her and her siblings, she moves in and out of multiple foster homes, eventually landing in an orphanage for the duration of her childhood and adolescence. Throughout life’s ups and downs, Maryanne learns to keep herself grounded, to never give up, and know in her heart that life has a way of taking the worst and making the best. Sadly, Maryanne never realizes the true meaning of family—until she meets her brother’s friend, William. But will Maryanne somehow find the courage to continue onward—even after losing everything—and overcome her obstacles to begin a new chapter? In this poignant young adult novel, an orphan embarks on a coming-of-age journey where she must find a way to persevere through her challenges to realize happiness.

GET BOOK

In early twentieth-century New York, a young social butterfly discovers the darker side of the big city . . . First in this suspenseful historical mystery series. A year before World War I breaks out, the sidewalks of Manhattan are crowded with restless newcomers chasing the fabled American Dream, including a sharp-witted young woman who discovers a talent for investigating murder . . . New York City, 1913. Twenty-year-old Louise Faulk has fled Altoona, Pennsylvania, to start a life under dizzying lights. In a city of endless possibilities, it’s not long before the young ingénue befriends a witty aspiring model and makes a splash at the liveliest parties on the Upper East Side. But glitter fades to grit when Louise’s Greenwich Village apartment becomes the scene of a violent murder and a former suitor hustling for Tin Pan Alley fame hits front-page headlines as the prime suspect. Driven to investigate the crime, Louise finds herself stepping into the seediest corners of the burgeoning metropolis—where she soon discovers that failed dreams can turn dark and deadly . . . Praise for the Louise Faulk Mystery series “Maisie Dobbs fans will be pleased.”—Publishers Weekly

GET BOOK

During his fifty-year career Harold Robbins, the godfather of the airport novel, sold approximately 750 million copies of his books worldwide. His seventh novel, The Carpetbaggers, a steamy tale of sex, greed, and corruption loosely based on the life of Howard Hughes, is the fourth-most-read book in history. As decadent as his fiction was, however, his life was just as profligate. Over the course of his five-decade career, Robbins spent money as quickly as he earned it, reportedly wasting away $50 million on everything from booze and drugs to yachts and prostitutes. Based on extensive interviews with family members and friends, including Larry Flynt and Barbara Eden, Harold Robbins examines the remarkable life of the man who gave birth to the cult of the modern bestseller and introduced sex to the American marketplace.

GET BOOK

A heart-warming and nostalgic Cornish family saga. Perfect for fans of Sheila Newberry and Katie Flynn. WHEN TRAGEDY STRIKES, WILL HER FAMILY COME TOGETHER AGAIN? Almost a decade after being rescued from a shipwreck by a local Cornish family, sixteen-year-old Lottie is settled in St Ives with her adoptive family. But after a trip to America to meet her birth mother ends badly, Lottie fears her new life might be falling apart . . . Arriving back in Cornwall, Lottie struggles to adjust to life with her temperamental mother around, and her very arrival shakes up their quiet community. Lottie, too, faces a more difficult problem - she's hiding the secret of her first love. And soon she is forced to make a choice between her duty to her family and to her heart. As new challenges arrive for Lottie and the community in St Ives, will she and her family be able to overcome their troubles and find their way back to each other? From the bestselling author of The Boy With No Boots, An Orphan's Winter is the most captivating story you'll read this winter! 'Jeffries is an outstanding writer of sagas with heart and feeling. Her writing is warm and sympathetic – I recommend whatever she writes!' ROSIE CLARKE

GET BOOK

There is no available information at this time.

GET BOOK

“It’s so hard to believe that this is a debut novel! It’s an historic novel. Talk about hitting me on so many good points.” –John Busbee, The Culture Buzz, weekly on www.KFMG.org “Set against the harsh backdrop of Montana, You Belong Here Now is a novel as straightforward and powerful as the characters who populate it. I love this book, and I guarantee you won’t find a finer debut work anywhere.” — William Kent Krueger, New York Times bestselling author of This Tender Land “You Belong Here Now distills the essence of the American spirit in this uplifting story. Perfect for book clubs looking to discuss the true meaning of family.” — Kathleen Grissom, New York Times bestselling author of The Kitchen House In this brilliant debut reminiscent of William Kent Krueger's This Tender Land and Lisa Wingate's Before We Were Yours, three orphans journey westward from New York City to the Big Sky Country of Montana, hoping for a better life where beautiful wild horses roam free. Montana 1925: Three brave kids from New York board the orphan train headed west. An Irish boy who lost his whole family to Spanish flu, a tiny girl who won’t talk, and a volatile young man who desperately needs to escape Hell’s Kitchen. They are paraded on platforms across the Midwest to work-worn folks and journey countless miles, racing the sun westward. Before they reach the last rejection and stop, the kids come up with a daring plan, and they set off toward the Yellowstone River and grassy mountains where the wild horses roam. Fate guides them toward the ranch of a family stricken by loss. Broken and unable to outrun their pasts in New York, the family must do the unthinkable in order to save them. Nara, the daughter of a successful cattleman, has grown into a brusque spinster who refuses the kids on sight. She’s worked hard to gain her father’s respect and hopes to run their operation, but if the kids stay, she’ll be stuck in the kitchen. Nara works them without mercy, hoping they’ll run off, but they buck up and show spirit, and though Nara will never be motherly, she begins to take to them. So, when Charles is jailed for freeing wild horses that were rounded up for slaughter, and an abusive mother from New York shows up to take the youngest, Nara does the unthinkable, risking everything she holds dear to change their lives forever. “From the moment the reader steps on the train with these orphaned children, You Belong Here Now shows how beauty can emerge from even the darkest places.” —Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway’s Girl “Rostad’s bighearted debut is full of surprises, and warm with wisdom about what it means to be family.” —Meg Waite Clayton, New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London

GET BOOK

The compelling new book from the author of The Girl in the Ragged Shawl and The Orphans of Halfpenny Street

GET BOOK

In 1913, while the women’s suffrage movement gains momentum in the nation’s capital, the thought of a woman joining the New York City police force is downright radical, even if recent transplant Louise Faulk has already solved a murder . . . Louise has finally gathered the courage to take the police civil service exam, but when she returns to her secretary job at the midtown publishing house of Van Hooten and McChesney, she’s shocked to find the offices smoldering from a deadly, early morning fire. Huddled on the sidewalk, her coworkers inform her that Guy Van Hooten’s body has been found in the charred ruins. Rumors of foul play are already circulating, and the firm’s surviving partner asks Louise to investigate the matter. Despite a number of possible suspects, the last person Louise expects to be arrested is Ogden McChesney, an old friend and mentor to her aunt Irene. Louise will have to search high and low, from the tenements in the Lower East Side to the very clouds above the tallest skyscrapers, to get to the bottom of an increasingly complex case . . .

GET BOOK

With the economic rise of the "Celtic Tiger" in the 1990s, Irish culture was deeply impacted by a concurrent rise in immigration. A nation tending to see itself as a land of emigrants suddenly saw waves of newcomers. In this book, Moynihan takes as her central question a formulation by sociologist Steve Garner: "What happens when other people’s diasporas converge on the homeland of diasporic people?" Approaching the question from a cultural rather than a sociological vantage point, Moynihan delves into fiction, drama, comedy, and cinema since 1998 to examine the various representations of and insights into race relations. "Other People’s Diasporas" draws upon the recent fiction of Joseph O’Connor, Roddy Doyle, and Emma Donoghue; films directed by Jim Sheridan and Eugene Brady; drama by Donal O’Kelly and Ronan Noone; and the comedy of Des Bishop to present a highly original and engaging exploration of contemporary Irish discourses on race.

GET BOOK

The waltz, perhaps the most beloved social dance of the 19th and early 20th centuries, once provoked outrage from religious leaders and other self-appointed arbiters of social morality. Decrying the corrupting influence of social dancing, they failed to suppress the popularity of the waltz or other dance crazes of the period, including the Charleston, the tango, and “animal dances” such as the Turkey Trot, Grizzly Bear, and Bunny Hug. This book investigates the development of these popular dances, considering in particular how their very existence as “taboo” cultural fads ultimately provided a catalyst for lasting social reform. In addition to examining the impact of the waltz and other scandalous dances on fashion, music, leisure, and social reform, the text describes the opposition to dance and the proliferation of literature on both sides.

GET BOOK

Bringing together scholars from musicology, literature, childhood studies, and theater, this volume examines the ways in which children's musicals tap into adult nostalgia for childhood while appealing to the needs and consumer potential of the child. The contributors take up a wide range of musicals, including works inspired by the books of children's authors such as Roald Dahl, P.L. Travers, and Francis Hodgson Burnett; created by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Lionel Bart, and other leading lights of musical theater; or conceived for a cast made up entirely of children. The collection examines musicals that propagate or complicate normative attitudes regarding what childhood is or should be. It also considers the child performer in movie musicals as well as in professional and amateur stage musicals. This far-ranging collection highlights the special place that musical theater occupies in the imaginations and lives of children as well as adults. The collection comes at a time of increased importance of musical theater in the lives of children and young adults.

GET BOOK

Evan Smoak—government assassin gone rogue—returns in Hellbent, an engrossing, unputdownable thriller from Gregg Hurwitz, the latest in his #1 international bestselling Orphan X series. Taken from a group home at age twelve, Evan Smoak was raised and trained as an off-the-books government assassin: Orphan X. After he broke with the Orphan Program, Evan disappeared and reinvented himself as the Nowhere Man, a man spoken about only in whispers and dedicated to helping the truly desperate. But this time, the voice on the other end is Jack Johns, the man who raised and trained him, the only father Evan has ever known. Secret government forces are busy trying to scrub the remaining assets and traces of the Orphan Program and they have finally tracked down Jack. With little time remaining, Jack gives Evan his last assignment: find and protect his last protégé and recruit for the program. But Evan isn’t the only one after this last Orphan—the new head of the Orphan Program, Van Sciver, is mustering all the assets at his disposal to take out both Evan (Orphan X) and the target he is trying to protect.

GET BOOK

Animal abuse has been an acknowledged problem for centuries, but only within the past few decades has scientific research provided evidence that the maltreatment of animals often overlaps with violence toward people. The variants of violence, including bullying or assaults in a schoolyard, child abuse in homes, violence between adult intimate partners, community hostility in our streets and neighborhoods, and even the context of war, are now the subject of concerted research efforts. Very often, the association of these forms of violence with cruelty to animals has been found. The perpetrators of such inhumane treatment are often children and adolescents. How common are these incidents? What motivates human maltreatment of animals? Are there cultural, societal, neighborhood, and family contexts that contribute to cruelty to animals? How early in a child's life does cruelty to animals emerge and are these incidents always a sign of future interpersonal violence? Are there ways of preventing such cruelty? Can we intervene effectively with children who already have a history of abuse and violence? Children and Animals: Exploring the Roots of Kindness and Cruelty presents the current scientific and professional wisdom about the relation between the maltreatment of animals and interpersonal violence directed toward other human beings. However, the author, Frank R. Ascione, a noted expert in these areas, writes in a style and presents the findings in a language that will be understandable to parents, teachers, counselors, clergy, animal welfare professionals, foster parents, mental health professionals, youth workers, law enforcement professionals, and anyone else whose work or interest crosses into the lives of children and adolescents.

GET BOOK

Fueled with in-depth research and personal recollections, Hooligan’s Alley presents a historic novel embracing generations of early European immigrants and their amazing struggles. In the style of a novel, author Joanna Kelly tells the true story of Wilhelmina Huebner Metting, an orphaned farm girl who uprooted her life in Germany to search for an aunt living far away in America. Her quest took her to New York’s infamous Hell’s Kitchen, an area of overcrowded slums, lumberyards, slaughterhouses, factories, and immigrants troubled by poverty and violence. There, seventeen-year-old Wilhelmina started a seamstress business and kept cows on a vacant city lot. Wilhelmina was, above all things, a passionate social reformer. She encountered American society first during the Civil War, a time of great social unrest. Her involvement with the Colored Orphan Asylum put her in the center of the New York City Draft Riots, the largest uprising in the history of the United States. Wilhelmina’s story inspired Kelly, who fleshed out the few hard facts she could find with a lovingly researched fictional visit to a long-lost time and place in America’s history. “Joanna Kelly...draws special strength from her Quaker faith as well as her insatiable thirst for history in writing her first novel, Hooligan’s Alley. She is a gifted writer who explores her love of music, wildflowers, and passion for family in weaving this remarkable series of adventures that will set your heart to racing, while stretching your own recollections and imagination. Hooligan’s Alley is a must-read for New Yorkers and history lovers, and everyone who cares about origins and family.” —E. Barrie Kavasch best-selling author of The Medicine Wheel Garden

GET BOOK

The first novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Idiot Girls’ Action-Adventure Club is a rollicking tale of small-town peculiarity, dark secrets, and one extraordinary beauty pageant. When her husband is offered a post at a small university, Maye is only too happy to pack up and leave the relentless Phoenix heat for the lush green quietude of Spaulding, Washington. While she loves the odd little town, there is one thing she didn’t anticipate: just how heartbreaking it would be leaving her friends behind. And when you’re a childless thirtysomething freelance writer who works at home, making new friends can be quite a challenge. After a series of false starts nearly gets her exiled from town, Maye decides that her last chance to connect with her new neighbors is to enter the annual Sewer Pipe Queen Pageant, a kooky but dead-serious local tradition open to contestants of all ages and genders. Aided by a deranged former pageant queen with one eyebrow, Maye doesn’t just make a splash, she uncovers a sinister mystery that has haunted the town for decades. “[Laurie Notaro] may be the funniest writer in this solar system.”—The Miami Herald

GET BOOK

Taking in novelists from all over the globe, from the beginning of the century to the present day, this is the most comprehensive survey of the leading lights of twentieth century fiction. Superb breadth of coverage and over 800 entries by an international team of contributors ensures that this fascinating and wide-ranging work of reference will be invaluable to anyone with an interest in modern fiction. Authors included range from Joseph Conrad to Albert Camus and Franz Kafka to Chinua Achebe. Who's Who of Twentieth Century Novelists gives a superb insight into the richness and diversity of the twentieth century novel.

GET BOOK

From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature and author of the Booker Prize–winning novel The Remains of the Day comes this stunning work of soaring imagination. Born in early-twentieth-century Shanghai, Banks was orphaned at the age of nine after the separate disappearances of his parents. Now, more than twenty years later, he is a celebrated figure in London society; yet the investigative expertise that has garnered him fame has done little to illuminate the circumstances of his parents' alleged kidnappings. Banks travels to the seething, labyrinthine city of his memory in hopes of solving the mystery of his own, painful past, only to find that war is ravaging Shanghai beyond recognition-and that his own recollections are proving as difficult to trust as the people around him. Masterful, suspenseful and psychologically acute, When We Were Orphans offers a profound meditation on the shifting quality of memory, and the possibility of avenging one’s past.

GET BOOK

The year is 1909. Coney Island is a bright, malodorous, and garish place, luring work-weary folks in with its dangerous roller coasters, bizarre displays, and promises of "improper" gaiety to be remembered. Three grand amusement parks—Steeplechase, Luna Park, and Dreamland—make Coney Island their home, as do countless independent shows along the Bowery. And some, such as the sinister Snow's Symposium of Secrets and Surprises, take much more from customers than they give. Suzanne Heath is a ticket-seller for Luna Park as well a reluctant psychic. She has been called in by police Lieutenant Granger to help find and stop a murderer whose victims have been dreadfully mutilated. Suzanne feels obligated to offer her assistance even thought doing forces her to recall memories of her youth, a time when her psychic talents only brought about rejection and pain. Suzanne's one true friend is Cittie Parker, a young man who ran away from the Colored Waifs' Asylum and now performs as a bloodthirsty Zulu drummer in Dreamland. He knows of Suzanne's abilities and fears for her safety. As Suzanne digs deeper into the grisly Coney Island murders and her own past, she finds herself and Cittie caught up in a nightmare where worlds converge and collide, where death gleefully beckons, and insanity grins like a devil at the gate of hell.

GET BOOK

After her first husband is presumed killed in World War I, milliner Carsie Levy marries Chat Nussbaum and together with Carsie's daughters, Sarit and Sophia, they settle into a quiet routine. But between the World Wars life outside the walls of the Nussbaum's red brick mansion on New York City's East 66 th Street is anything but quiet-the politics and pace of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression contrive in ways Carsie cannot imagine to wrest her of her family, her business and, ultimately, her sanity.

GET BOOK

The Silent Epidemic addresses a critical public health problem in America – the leading preventable cause of birth defects, neurodevelopmental disorders, and intellectual disability: prenatal alcohol exposure. From her work in community health, forensic psychiatry, and private practice, Dr. Rich provides insight into the prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorder associated with prenatal alcohol exposure (ND-PAE) among juveniles accused of violent crimes, in neighborhoods where America’s “least valued” citizens reside, and even in upper middle class communities. The problem develops as early as the first three weeks of pregnancy, when many women are unaware that they are pregnant. With appropriate diagnosis and treatment, affected individuals can avoid a lifetime of lost potential from substance use disorders, incarceration, unemployment, and homelessness.

GET BOOK

From Anchorage to Washington D.C., take a trip through America’s well-loved cities with this unique A-Z like no other, lavishly illustrated and annotated with key cultural icons, from famous people and inventions to events, food, and monuments. Explore skyscraper streets, museum miles, local food trucks, and city parks of the United States of America and discover more than 2,000 facts that celebrate the people, culture, and diversity that have helped make America what it is today. Cities include Anchorage • Atlanta • Austin • Baltimore • Birmingham • Boise • Boston • Burlington • Charleston • Charlotte • Cheyenne • Chicago • Cleveland • Columbus • Denver • Detroit • Hartford • Honolulu • Houston • Indianapolis • Jacksonville • Kansas City • Las Vegas • Little Rock • Los Angeles • Louisville • Memphis • Miami • Milwaukee • Minneapolis-St. Paul • Nashville • New Orleans • New York • Newark • Newport • Oklahoma City • Philadelphia • Phoenix • Pittsburgh • Portland, ME • Portland, OR • Rapid City • Salt Lake City • San Francisco • Santa Fe • Seattle • St. Louis • Tucson • Virginia Beach • Washington, D.C. The 50 States series of books for young explorers celebrates the USA and the wider world with key facts and fun activities about the people, history, and natural environments that make each location within them uniquely wonderful. Beautiful illustrations, maps, and infographics bring the places to colorful life. Also available from the series:The 50 States, The 50 States: Activity Book, The 50 States: Fun Facts, 50 Trailblazers of the 50 States, 50 Maps of the World, 50 Adventures in the 50 States, 50 Maps of the World Activity Book, Only in America!, and We Are the 50 States.

GET BOOK

Spellbound Arthur Kenzie’s life’s work is protecting the world from the supernatural relics that could destroy it. When an amulet with the power to control the tides is shipped to New York, he must intercept it before it can be used to devastating effects. This time, in order to succeed, he needs a powerful psychometric…and the only one available has sworn off his abilities altogether. Rory Brodigan’s gift comes with great risk. To protect himself, he’s become a recluse, redirecting his magic to find counterfeit antiques. But with the city’s fate hanging in the balance, he can’t force himself to say no. As Arthur coaxes him out of seclusion, a magical and emotional bond begins to form. One that proves impossible to break—even when Arthur sacrifices himself to keep Rory safe and Rory must risk everything to save him. Starcrossed Arthur’s continued quest to contain supernatural relics that pose a threat to the world captured Rory’s imagination—and his heart. Butwhen a group of ruthless paranormals throw the city into chaos, the two men’s strained relationship leaves Rory vulnerable to a monster from Arthur’s past. With dark forces determined to tear them apart, Rory and Arthur will have to draw on every last bit of magic up their sleeves. And in the end, it’s the connection they’ve formed without magic that will be tested like never before. Wonderstruck Arthur's search to to destroy the powerful supernatural relic that threatens Manhattan has been fruitless . All it has done is keep him from the man he loves. But he’ll do anything to keep Rory safe and free, even if that means leaving him behind. Rory is determined to gain power over his own magic. He can take care of himself—and maybe even Arthur, too, if Arthur will let him. An auction at the Paris world’s fair offers the perfect opportunity to destroy the relic, if a group of power-hungry supernaturals don’t destroy Rory and Arthur first. As the magical world converges on Paris, Arthur and Rory have to decide who they can trust. Guessing wrong could spell destruction for their bond—and for the world as they know it

GET BOOK

Whether in movies, cartoons, commercials, or even fast food marketing, psychology and mental illness remain pervasive in popular culture. In this collection of new essays, scholars from a range of fields explore representations of mental illness and disabilities across various media of popular culture. Contributors address how forms of psychiatric disorder have been addressed in film, on stage, and in literature, how popular culture genres are utilized to communicate often confusing and conflicted relationships with the mentally ill, and how popular cultures around the world reflect mental illness and disability. Analyses of sources as disparate as the Batman films, Broadway musicals and Nigerian home movies reveal how definitions of mental illness, mental health, and of psychology itself intersect with discourses on race, gender, law, capitalism, and globalization. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

GET BOOK

Aiden Page wanted only to escape. The CFO of a bank deep in debt and under investigation by the Department of Justice, Aiden saw his chance and took it, leaving behind his family, his creditors, and his persecutors by convincing them of his death. He succeeds in his deception until one night when, tortured by guilt and loneliness, he places a call to his teenage daughter, Morgan. He only utters a single word, but like a solitary ripple spreading across the water, it is enough to convince Morgan that her father is still alive. Determined to be reunited with her father and confident that she knows where he might be going, Morgan sets out on an ambitious and dangerous journey to a small Pacific island. With little money, no driver's license, and no passport, Morgan attempts to reach her destination by sailboat, prepared to fight through hostile waters, and hostile men, if it means finding her father. But Morgan isn't the only one searching for Aiden. The same people who engineered his company's collapse know that he is the only man who can uncover a conspiracy that could destroy far more than one bank or a single life. The group is unconstrained by morality, undeterred by mercy, and it will do anything in its power, including using Morgan as a pawn, if it ensures that Aiden Page remains a corpse. Now Aiden must solve the mystery behind his exile if he hopes to save not just his own life but his daughter's as well. Before his race is over, he will discover that thousands of lives may depend upon the actions of a dead man.

GET BOOK

To save Manhattan, they’ll have to save each other first… 1925 New York Arthur Kenzie’s life’s work is protecting the world from the supernatural relics that could destroy it. When an amulet with the power to control the tides is shipped to New York, he must intercept it before it can be used to devastating effects. This time, in order to succeed, he needs a powerful psychometric…and the only one available has sworn off his abilities altogether. Rory Brodigan’s gift comes with great risk. To protect himself, he’s become a recluse, redirecting his magic to find counterfeit antiques. But with the city’s fate hanging in the balance, he can’t force himself to say no. Being with Arthur is dangerous, but Rory’s ever-growing attraction to him begins to make him brave. And as Arthur coaxes him out of seclusion, a magical and emotional bond begins to form. One that proves impossible to break—even when Arthur sacrifices himself to keep Rory safe and Rory must risk everything to save him. One-click with confidence. This title is part of the Carina Press Romance Promise: all the romance you’re looking for with an HEA/HFN. It’s a promise! This book is approximately 75,000 words

GET BOOK

Owney Madden lived a seemingly quiet life for decades in the resort town of Hot Springs, Arkansas, while he was actually helping some of America's most notorious gangsters rule a vast criminal empire. In 1987, Graham Nown first told Madden's story in his book The English Godfather, in which he traced Madden's boyhood in England, his immigration to New York City, and his rise to mob boss. Nown also uncovered a love story involving Madden and the daughter of the Hot Springs postmaster. Before his arrival in Hot Springs, Madden was one of the most powerful gangsters in New York City and former owner of the famous Cotton Club in Harlem. The story of his life shows us a world where people can break the law without ever getting caught, and where criminality is so entwined in government and society that one might wonder what is legality and what isn't.

GET BOOK

The same rides that killed people in 1907 are mysteriously breaking down again more than a century later . . . and somewhere in time, a killer waits. Malfunctioning rides caused multiple deaths at Steeplechase Park in 1907 . . . and in 2017. Katie Silver is sure she was working there -- in both centuries. Could she hold the key to the darkest of secrets? Two worlds collide to reveal the astonishing truth. BookShots Lightning-fast stories by James Patterson Novels you can devour in a few hours Impossible to stop reading All original content from James Patterson

GET BOOK

A professional behavioral witness to more than a hundred capital trials explores the making of a murderer. CSI shows us where a crime is committed. Forensic detectives show us how. But what really goes on in the mind of killer? What is it in each potential victim that sparks in them the urge to take a life? What are the reasons behind a quick thrill kill, or slow torture? Between choosing someone they know, or a stranger? As they stand before a jury, after reams of graphic evidence, the question is no longer whether or not they committed the unthinkable. The question posed to Wanda Draper, expert in behavioral science and child development, and key witness in more than a hundred high-profile trials, is why? The answer is all that stands between a sentence of life in prison or death row. In this unique true-crime investigation, Draper shares some of the darkest cases of her career. She sheds light on the personal circumstances and critical life events that perverted childhoods and brought convicted murderers to trial. She reveals how the past casts a grave shadow over one’s future. And in doing so, explores one irrefutable fact: killers aren’t born, they’re made.

GET BOOK

'What is remarkable about Alan Ayckbourn's comedy is that it contrives to be simultaneously hilarious and harrowing. Literally, it is agonisingly funny' Daily Telegraph In Three Plays Ayckbourn's perfectly pitched dialogue slices into the soul of suburbia. The settings are simple - a kitchen, a bedroom, a party - but the relationships between the husbands and wives are more complicated. Fraught relationships are exposed with humour, bathos and a sharp understanding of human nature.

GET BOOK

Allan Carpenter escaped from hell once but remained haunted by what he saw and endured. He has now returned, on a mission to liberate those souls unfairly tortured and confined. Partnering with the legendary poet and suicide, Sylvia Plath, Carpenter is a modern-day Christ who intends to harrow hell and free the damned. But now that he's returned to this Dantesque Inferno, can he ever again leave? At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

GET BOOK