Home Making

Read or download online Home Making ebook full in format Pdf, ePub, Kindle, and many more. Home Making written by Lee Matalone, published by HarperCollins on 2020-02-18 with 208 pages for you to read. Home Making is one from many Fiction books that available for free in the amazon kindle unlimited, click Get Book to start reading and download books online free now. With Kindle Unlimited Free trial, you can read as many books as you want today.

Home Making

Home Making

  • Author : Lee Matalone
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Fiction
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Pages : 208
  • Release Date : 2020-02-18

"An intricate exploration of family and home, of mother and child, of friends, of women and written with both precision and style."—Weike Wang, author of Chemistry From a talented, powerful new voice in fiction comes a stunning novel about the intersection of three lives coming to grips with identity, family legacy, and what it means to make a house a true home. Cybil is a war child—the result of a brief affair between a young Japanese woman and a French soldier—who at a young age is transplanted to Tucson, Arizona, and raised by an American officer and his rigid wife. After a rebellious adolescence, she grows up to become a successful ob-gyn. Chloe, Cybil’s daughter, is adrift in an empty house in the hills of Virginia. Her marriage has fallen apart, and her estranged husband is dying of cancer. Room by room, Chloe makes her new house into a home, grappling always with the real and imagined boundaries that limit her as a single, childless woman in contemporary America. Beau, Chloe’s closest friend, is in love with a man he’s only met on the internet, who lives across the country. Shepherding Chloe through her grief, he is often called back to his loud, humid, chaotic childhood in Southwest Louisiana, where he first reckoned with the intricate ties between queerness, loneliness, and place. Through each of these characters Matalone weaves a moving, beautiful narrative of home, identity, and belonging. Home Making is a somber, yet hopeful, ode to the stories we tell ourselves in order to make a family.

This is a book on how home is made when care enters the lives of people as they grow old at home or in ‘homely’ institutions. Throughout the book, contributors show how home is a verb: it is something people do. Home is thus always in the making, temporal, contested, and open to negotiation and experimentation. By bringing together approaches from STS, anthropology, health humanities and health care studies, the book points to the importance of people's tinkerings and experiments with making home, as it is here that home is being made and unmade.

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This book explores the relationships between home, work and migration among Vietnamese people in East London, demonstrating the diversity of home-making practices and forms of belonging in relation to the dwelling, workplace and wider city. Engaging with wider scholarship on transnationalism, urban mobilities and the geopolitical dimensions of home among migrants and diasporic communities, the author draws on ethnographic work to examine the experiences of people who migrated from Vietnam to London at different times and in diverse circumstances, including individuals who arrived as refugees in the 1970s, as well as those who have migrated for work or education in recent years. Migration, Work and Home-Making in the City thus sheds new light on the social, material and spiritual practices through which people create senses of home that connect them with their country of origin, and reveals how home-making is constrained by immigration policies, insecure housing and precarious work, thus highlighting the barriers to belonging in the city.

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The hall is the threshold of the house. It serves as an introduction. This first impression should be one of welcome and dignity and, above all, of order. Good light, genial colors on the walls and floors, a sense of free space for the passage of persons, an ample provision for the necessary wraps and umbrellas in a tidy and concealed form, are the essential characteristics of a well-considered hall, regardless of its size. -from "Home Furnishing" This classic text of home management was found in every proper household in the post World War I period, and it continues to have much to offer today. Looking at the home literally from the ground up and from the inside out, its invaluable and still timely advice includes: .choosing a sound house floor plan and exterior design .how to read gas and electric meters .protecting and storing silverware .removal of stains on a variety of soiled fabrics .proper diet for the sick .how to make pastries and yeast breads .and much more. First published in 1919, this is a fascinating peek back at American domesticity... and a reminder of how much, and how little, has changed. American editor and activist MARTHA VAN RENSSELAER (1864-1932) wrote regularly on home economics for popular women's magazines. In 1908, she and American educator FLORA ROSE (1874-1959) created the Department of Home Economics at Cornell University, which became the School of Home Economics in 1919; Rose served as deputy director for the New York State division of the United States Food Administration during World War I. They were assisted at Cornell by American educator HELEN CANON (1888-1954), who, in 1930, became the university's first head of the Department of Economics of theHousehold and Household Management.

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It is intended that women be happy and successful in their homemaking. Being a homemaker is a divine appointment and is a woman’s greatest calling. It should be rich in the rewards of joy, satisfaction and accomplishment. All too often, however, women feel confused, distraught or bored with their role as homemakers. They frequently dread each day, live for the time when their children will be raised so they can be released from it all, or they escape from their responsibilities to their home and family and return to the business world. Other women do enjoy their homemaking activities but find their work consumes most of their day and there is little time for other interests. Many women are wonderful homemakers and managers but are eager for new ideas and skills to make their homemaking even more effective and satisfying. To all of these women, this book offers a practical guide to happier homemaking. It recalls to mind the significance of homemaking and gives their attitude a lift. When the suggestions concerning order and efficiency, methods and approaches are applied, coupled with the workable plan which systematizes the routine duties, women will find their interest in homemaking greatly increasing and that there will be time to get their work done and enjoy creative activities, family fun and personal development. This is not just a book on how to keep house; it offers a way of life which will bring joy and satisfaction to the homemaker and rich, happy experiences to every family member.

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Master the delicate art of working from home with this comprehensive resource. Working from Home: Making the New Normal Work for You provides readers with a detailed strategy on how to turn working from home into a powerful career choice. Author and Salesforce executive Karen Mangia teaches readers how to: Build the future of work in any kind of space: ideas for your home office that fit anywhere Create personalized time management routines designed specifically for remote productivity, impact, and balance—even while wearing your sweatpants Deal with Zoom fatigue, burnout, and isolation, via untapped new strategies for connection and team-building, even when the team is remote Discover how to deliver powerful virtual presentations and build career impact online, with expert communication strategies designed for an online world Working from Home explains in detail how to turn even the smallest of living spaces into the ideal remote work environment. It comprehensively explores how you can make yourself vital to any organization without ever setting foot in an office building. Because success isn’t a location: you can move your career forward from anywhere, if you know how to do it. This book will show you how to embrace the new normal and make sure your career doesn’t miss a beat. Full of concrete strategies and practical advice, Working from Home is a must-read for anyone who wants to know how to find that elusive work/life balance when working remote. With guidance on how to create a work-from-home culture designed for success, it’s a perfect choice for early-in-career professionals, sales leaders, team managers, and business executives looking for fresh ideas on the future of work.

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“Shows us why the actions that prepare us for emergencies and energy descent are the right things to do no matter what the future brings.” —Toby Hemenway, author of Gaia’s Garden Other books tell us how to live the good life—but you might have to win the lottery to do it. Making Home is about improving life with the real people around us and the resources we already have. While encouraging us to be more resilient in the face of hard times, author Sharon Astyk also points out the beauty, grace, and elegance that result, because getting the most out of everything we use is a way of transforming our lives into something much more fulfilling. Written from the perspective of a family who has already made this transition, Making Home shows readers how to turn the challenge of living with less into settling for more—more happiness, more security, and more peace of mind. Learn simple but effective strategies to: · Save money on everything from heating and cooling to refrigeration, laundry, water, sanitation, cooking, and cleaning · Create a stronger, more resilient family · Preserve more for future generations We must make fundamental changes to our way of life in the face of ongoing economic crisis and energy depletion. Making Home takes the fear out of this prospect, and invites us to embrace a simpler, more abundant reality. “Americans are born to be transient—Sharon Astyk has the prescription for dealing with that genetic disease, and building a healthy nativeness into our lives.” —Bill McKibben, New York Times–bestselling author “Exhaustively researched and compassionately delivered.” —Harriet Fasenfest, author of A Householder’s Guide to the Universe

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In recent years, social and economic pressures have combined to affect the traditional role of the homemaker. With emphasis being placed on the world of work as opposed to the life of home, many people now struggle to fulfil several functions simultaneously. This increasingly busy and hectic climate has led to an apparent downgrading of the work of the homemaker. Taking a spiritual perspective inspired by the work of Rudolf Steiner, Veronika van Duin suggests that homemaking needs to be undertaken consciously as an honoured and valued task - as nothing less than a 'social art'. If we are to enjoy happy and contented family and home lives, the role of homemaker ought to be regarded highly. Without claiming that there is a blueprint for perfect homemaking, the author offers principles and observations based on a study of the seven 'life processes' and how they work on us. She addresses the significance of rhythm, relationships, artistic environment, caring, self development, and much more besides in this invaluable book.

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Culture, Religion, and Home-making in and Beyond South Asia explores how the idea of the home is repurposed or re-envisioned in relation to experiences of modernity, urbanization, conflict, migration and displacement. It considers how these processes are reflected in rituals, beliefs and social practices. It explores the processes by which "home" may be constructed and how relocations often result in either the replication or rejection of traditional homes and identities. Ponniah examines the various contestations surrounding the categories of "home" and "religion," including interfaith families, urban spaces, and sacred places.

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This book develops a theoretical perspective on homemaking as the ethnic condition of Indian diaspora communities. It draws on empirical case studies to elucidate the multiple homemaking practices of two overseas Indian groups and their relations to their homeland, namely the Surinami Hindustanis and the Dutch Hindustanis. In doing so, it provides a new perspective on homemaking that captures ethnogenesis, integration and diasporic bonding at once. As opposed to the extant discourse on homemaking which overlooks institutional and cultural requirements, the author makes a point to scrutinise such concepts as douglarisation, groupism, citizenship, institutions, ethnification, social networks and technology, and transnational flows. Unique and compelling, the book will be highly useful in studies of diaspora, globalisation and transnational migration, multiculturalism, cultural studies, ethnic minority studies, sociology, politics and international relations, and South Asian studies.

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When it comes to your home, peace is possible... Longing for a place of peace from which you can love others well? The Clutter-Free Home is your room-by-room guide to decluttering, reclaiming, and celebrating every space of your home. Let author Kathi Lipp (who once lived a life buried in clutter) walk you through each room of your house to create organizational zones that are not only functional and practical but create places of peace that reflect your personality. Kathi will help you tackle the four-step process of dedicate, decide, declutter and “do-your-thing” to reveal the home you’ve always dreamed of, and then transform it into a haven that reflects who you truly are meant to be. If you’re also feeling overwhelmed by the care and upkeep of all the stuff under your feet or sense that your home is running you, instead of the other way around, come discover how to create a space that doesn’t have to be showroom perfect to be perfect for you and the people you love.

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Traditional approaches to Prairie literature have focussed on the significance of "the land" in attempts to make a place into a home. The emphasis on the importance of landscape as a defining feature ignores the important roles played by other influences brought to the land such as history, culture, gender, ethnicity, religion, community, family, and occupation. Deborah Keahey considers over 70 years of Canadian Prairie literature, including poetry, autobiography, drama, and fiction. The 17 writers range from the well-established, like Martha Ostenso and Robert Kroetsch, to newer writers, like Ian Ross and Kelly Rebar. Through their works, she asks whether the Prairies are a physical or a political creation, whether "home" is made by what you bring with you, or what you find when you arrive, and she incorporates the influences and effects far beyond landscape to understand what guides the "home-making" process of both the writers and their creations. Her study acknowledges that "home" is a complicated concept, and making a place into a home place is a complicated process. Informed by current linguistic, feminist, postcolonial, and cultural theory, Keahey explores these concepts in depth and redefines our understanding of place, home, and the relationship between them.

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In Homemaking for the Apocalypse, Jill E. Anderson interrogates patterns of Atomic Age conformity that controlled the domestic practices and private activities of Americans. Used as a way to promote security in a period rife with anxieties about nuclear annihilation and The Bomb, these narratives of domesticity were governed by ideals of compulsory normativity, and their circulation upheld the wholesale idealization of homemaking within a white, middle-class nuclear family and all that came along with it: unchecked reproduction, constant consumerism, and a general policing of practices deemed contradictory to normative American life. Homemaking for the apocalypse seeks out the disruptions to the domestic ideals found in memoirs, Civil Defense literature, the fallout shelter debate, horror films, comics, and science fiction, engaging in elements of horror in order to expose how closely domestic practices are tied to dread and anxiety. Homemaking for the Apocalypse offers a narrative of the Atomic Age that calls into question popular memory’s acceptance of the conformity thesis and proposes new methods for critiquing the domestic imperative of the period by acknowledging its deep tie to horror.

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Making Home in Diasporic Communities demonstrates the global scope of the Filipino diaspora, engaging wider scholarship on globalisation and the ways in which the dynamics of nation-state institutions, labour migration and social relationships intersect for transnational communities. Based on original ethnographic work conducted in Ireland and the Philippines, the book examines how Filipina diasporans socially and symbolically create a sense of ‘home’. On one hand, Filipinas can be seen as mobile, as they have crossed geographical borders and are physically located in the destination country. Yet, on the other hand, they are constrained by immigration policies, linguistic and cultural barriers and other social and cultural institutions. Through modalities of language, rituals and religion and food, the author examines the ways in which Filipinas orient their perceptions, expectations, practices and social spaces to ‘the homeland’, thus providing insight into larger questions of inclusion and exclusion for diasporic communities. By focusing on a range of Filipina experiences, including that of nurses, international students, religious workers and personal assistants, Making Home in Diasporic Communities explores the intersectionality of gender, race, class and belonging. As such, it will appeal to scholars of sociology and anthropology as well as those with interests in gender, identity, migration, ethnic studies, and the construction of home.

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Making Homes: Anthropology and Design is a strong addition to the emerging field of design anthropology. Based on the latest scholarship and practice in the social sciences as well as design, this interdisciplinary text introduces a new design ethnography which offers unique and original approaches to research and intervention in the home.Presenting a coherent theoretical and methodological framework for both ethnographers and designers, the authors examine ‘hot’ topics – ranging from movements and mobilities to im/material environments, to digital culture – and confront the challenges of a research and design environment which seeks to bring about the changes required for a sustainable, resilient, ‘safe’, and comfortable future.Written by leading experts in the field, the book draws on real-life examples from a wide range of international projects developed by the authors, other researchers, and designers. Illustrations throughout help to convey the methods and research visually. Readers will also have access to a related website which follows the authors’ ongoing research and includes video and written narrative examples of ethnographic research in the home.Transforming current understandings of the home, this is an essential read for students and researchers in fields such as design, anthropology, human geography, sociology, and media and communication studies.

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First published in 1996. The present volume, Homemaking: Women Writers and the Politics and Poetics of Home, enters the critical discourse on gender by way of two of its most pressing issues: the politics of women’s locations at the end of the twentieth century, and the division of experience into public and private. That the emergence of systematic feminist thought in the west coincided with the invention of "private life" should not surprise us. Feminist thinkers from Mary Wollstonecroft on were quick to realize that the designation of the public and the private, male and female, was key to the subordination of women.

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Far more than a guide to homemaking and being a fine host—although it is definitely all that too—The Inviting Life is about how to live each day with a desire and determination to turn the ordinary into something lovely. It’s also a book about why we should bother. Whether the subject is décor, ambience, shopping, feeding weary travellers, mixing cocktails, planning dinner parties, or getting yourself motivated for spring cleaning, Laura Calder affirms the value of our everyday activities and shows how beauty, creativity, and delight have the power to change the world. This one-of-a-kind book is both a page-turning narrative about Laura’s own hosting and home-making adventures and an invaluable work of reference. It’s a spur to ideas for everything from creating a welcoming living space and making a respectable salad, to putting guests at their ease and writing a thank-you note worth receiving. Written with candour and humour in Laura’s inimitable and engaging voice, The Inviting Life offers empowering guidance for anyone looking to take more pleasure in their life and home.

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Explores the impact of nostalgia on the construction of individual and collective identity for diasporic South-Asians in the UK and US. It argues that in the postcolonial context the affect produced by this nostalgia can have radical potential as a form of resistance.

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When you know there is a huge difference between having a house and a home… Clay Telling my family about the situation with Wes was scary, but it’s finally behind us, that secret is out in the open. Now I need to make sure that the house I’ve been working on for years will finally be a home… Aiden Spending a lot of time with Wes is giving me a different outlook on the prospects of having my own family, especially a big one like he has. It’s still early days, but I’m sure that if we all work together, we can make the house into a real home. Only, some plans go a little differently than expected… This is the seventh novella about Alpha Clay and Omega Aiden in Making a Family, which takes place in the non-shifter Omegaverse Mates World and contains mpreg (male-pregnancy).

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In this ethnographic study, Johannes Lenhard observes the daily practices, routines and techniques of people who are sleeping rough on the streets of Paris. The book focusses on their survival practises, their short-term desires and hopes, how they earn money through begging, how they choose the best place to sleep at night and what role drugs and alcohol play in their lives. The book also follows people through different institutional settings, including a homeless day centre, a needle exchange, a centre for people with alcohol problems and a homeless shelter.

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This book lays out a framework for understanding connections between home and mobility, and situates this within a multidisciplinary field of social research. The authors show how the idea of home offers a privileged entry point into forced migration, diversity and inequality. Using original fieldwork, they adopt an encompassing lens on labour, family and refugee flows, with cases of migrants from Latin America, Africa and the Indian subcontinent. With the book structured around these key topics, the authors look at how practices of home and mobility emerge along with emotions and manifold social processes. In doing so, their scope shifts from the household to streets, neighbourhoods, cities and even nations. Yet, the meaning of 'home' as a lived experience goes beyond place; the authors analyse literature on migration and mobility to reveal how the past and future are equally projected into imaginings of home.

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Thinking Home challenges and extends the existing scholarship on the subject of ‘home’ in a period which has seen unprecedented levels of movement cross the globe. Sanja Bahun and Bojana Petric have collated essays that revisit existing ideas to introduce new ways of thinking on home, from the individual and local, through communal, to the international levels. While home informs our feelings of belonging and displacement, and our activities, such as migration, housing, and language learning, Bahun, Petric and contributors look to specific under-studied areas and encompass them within a major framework that allows for assessment through multiple disciplinary and expressive lenses. Thinking Home examines examples such as temporary homes, homes on the road, new and emergent modes of home-making, and minority groups in home and housing debates. Fresh, timely and topical, Thinking Home is rooted in activism and policy-making in the sector of 'home'; the essays both challenge and extend the existing scholarship on this subject. This collection combines perspectives of aesthetics, anthropology, cultural and literary studies, law, linguistics, philosophy, sociology, psychoanalysis, political science and activist responses in one whole. It will be essential reading for students of anthropology, literary studies, cultural studies and philosophy.

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Space has emerged in recent years as a radical category in a range of related disciplines across the humanities. Of the many possible applications of this new interest, some of the most exciting and challenging have addressed the issue of domestic architecture and its function as a space for both the dramatisation and the negotiation of a cluster of highly salient issues concerning, amongst other things, belonging and exclusion, fear and desire, identity and difference.Our House is a cross-disciplinary collection of essays taking as its focus both the prospect and the possibility of 'the house'. This latter term is taken in its broadest possible resonance, encompassing everything from the great houses so beloved of nineteenth-century English novelists to the caravans and mobile homes of the latterday travelling community, and all points in between. The essays are written by a combination of established and emerging scholars, working in a variety of scholarly disciplines, including literary criticism, sociology, cultural studies, history, popular music, and architecture. No specific school or theory predominates, although the work of two key figures – Gaston Bachelard and Martin Heidegger – is engaged throughout. This collection engages with a number of key issues raised by the increasingly troubled relationship between the cultural (built) and natural environments in the contemporary world.

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Leading scholars in the sociology of migration, Michaela Benson and Karen O’Reilly, re-theorise lifestyle migration through a sustained focus on postcolonialism at its intersections with neoliberalism. This book provides an in-depth analysis of the interplay of colonial traces and neoliberal presents, the relationship between residential tourism and economic development, and the governance and regulation of lifestyle migration. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork undertaken by the authors among lifestyle migrants in Malaysia and Panama, they reveal the structural and material conditions that support migration and how these are embodied by migrant subjects, while also highlighting their agency within this process. This rigorous work marks an important contribution to emerging debates surrounding privileged migration and mobility. It will appeal to sociologists, social theorists, human and cultural geographers, economists, social psychologists, demographers, social anthropologists, tourism and migration studies specialists.

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This is the first academic book to examine the long running hit series Grand Designs, which occupies a significant place in the popular imagination internationally. The authors apply an empirically grounded, critical perspective to the study of television to reveal how people use the program in their everyday lives. The emphasis on everyday uses and meanings combines creatively with understanding the program theoretically, textually and in terms of its production structures. This position challenges framings of the popular lifestyle and factual television genre that has been dominated by a neoliberal or governmentality perspective for many years. Presented by British designer and writer, Kevin McCloud, Grand Designs follows the progress of home owners as they embark on design, renovation and building projects at almost always dizzying scales of endeavour. Understanding the program as both a text to analyse and a site of material impact, the book draws on interviews with production members, home renovators, building practitioners and audiences, as well as references to associated media formats to provide contextual depth to the analysis. The authors argue that, as a cultural object, the program is both shaped by and enacts social discourses of home-making, design value and taste. Navigating public, commercial and promotional logics, Grand Designs sparks new forms of cultural production and consumer markets.

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A practical paperback edition of the landmark design manifesto from the UK’s favourite design guru.

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This is the first book to explore how religious movements and actors shape and are shaped by aspects of global city dynamics. Theoretically grounded and empirically informed, Religion and the Global City advances discussions in the field of urban religion, and establishes future research directions. David Garbin and Anna Strhan bring together a wealth of ethnographically rich and vivid case studies in a diversity of urban settings, in both Global North and Global South contexts. These case studies are drawn from both 'classical' global cities such as London and Paris, and also from large cosmopolitan metropolises - such as Bangalore, Rio de Janeiro, Lagos, Singapore and Hong Kong – which all constitute, in their own terms, powerful sites within the informational, cultural and moral networked economies of contemporary globalization. The chapters explore some of the most pressing issues of our times: globalization and the role of global neo-liberal regimes; urban change and in particular the dramatic urbanization of Global South countries; and religious politics and religious revivalism associated, for instance, with transnational Islam or global Pentecostal/Charismatic Christianity.

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Reveries of Home considers understandings of home in the world today and the means by which feelings of homeliness are secured. In particular, the volume explores the relationship between the phenomenon of globalisation and the ways in which home-making entails acts of practical and symbolic emplacement in landscapes felt to be meaningful and authentic. A series of case-studies, from Norway and West Africa, the mid-western USA, Egypt, Scotland and elsewhere, offer an illustrative array of homes made in rural communities and urban worksites, in personal life-histories and the policies of diasporic groups, in ceremonial revivals and mundane routines: in postcards, house furnishings, dreams, clothes and smells. Home-making appears as a kind of work; and it is ongoing, for ‘place’ and being ‘emplaced’ are not givens. Instead, home-making exists in time: in moments of individual and collective performance which are both mundane and memorial. Reveries of Home offers a set of cases and a set of arguments that reveal the close connections that remain between home and identity, even in a world of movement.

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The idea that "home" is a special place, a separate place, a place where we can be our true selves, is so obvious to us today that we barely pause to think about it. But, as Judith Flanders shows in this revealing book, "home" is a relatively new concept. When in 1900 Dorothy assured the citizens of Oz that "There is no place like home," she was expressing a view that was a culmination of 300 years of economic, physical, and emotional change. In The Making of Home, Flanders traces the evolution of the house across northern Europe and America from the 16th to the early 20th century, and paints a striking picture of how the homes we know today differ from homes through history. The transformation of houses into homes, she argues, was not a private matter, but an essential ingredient in the rise of capitalism and the birth of the Industrial Revolution. Without "home," the modern world as we know it would not exist, and as Flanders charts the development of ordinary household objects—from cutlery, chairs, and curtains, to fitted kitchens, plumbing, and windows—she also peels back the myths that surround some of our most basic assumptions, including our entire notion of what it is that makes a family. As full of fascinating detail as her previous bestsellers, The Making of Home is also a book teeming with original and provocative ideas.

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"What decides why things go well one day and badly another? The events are the same, the homemaker is the same, yet on one occasion nothing works out for her and on another everything seems miraculously to fall into place. Is there a special ingredient within us that we can tap into and cultivate to generate the longed-for equilibrium?" Veronika van Duin began her career as a homemaker forty years ago. Setting out with love, enthusiasm and idealism, she soon discovered that she had no idea of the magnitude of the task, feeling herself to be 'very, very wanting'. As she writes: "...I felt guilty, pressurised and inadequate much of the time. I became increasingly conscious of my personal shortcomings. I also felt very alone, and sometimes lonely too..." It is from such humbling feelings that van Duin writes, offering support and hope for fellow homemakers. She reveals the discoveries that have provided her, and many others she has taught in workshops and courses, with the basic life tools for overcoming personal hindrances. In this wonderfully uplifting book, van Duin gives exercises for restoring balance, maintaining equilibrium, discovering understanding, creating joy, validating feeling, maintaining vitality and drive, developing insight, finding freedom, and much more.

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This book presents a critical analysis of the concept of ‘adequate housing’. While the concept of adequate housing is used largely as a normative standard in the protection of housing rights and in the implementation of housing policies, its apparent objectivity and universality have never been questioned by political and legal theory. This book analyses and challenges the understanding of this term in law and politics by investigating its relationship with the idea of ‘home’. ‘It is necessary to provide them with adequate housing!’ It is very common to hear this phrase when dealing with housing poverty, especially in relation to migrants, minorities, indigenous and other subaltern groups are concerned. But what does "adequate housing" mean? This book tackles this issue by proposing a critical analysis of this concept and of its use in the development of housing policies addressing the subaltern group par excellence in Europe, Roma. In so doing, it focuses on the lives of Roma and Sinti in Italy who have been the target of inclusion policies. Highlighting the emotional connection to housing, and dismantling some of the most ‘common sense’ ideas about Roma, it offers a radical revision of how social justice in the housing sector might be refigured. This book will be invaluable for scholars and students working on relevant themes in socio and critical legal studies, sociology, human rights, urban studies, human geography and Romani studies

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As we grapple with a growing refugee crisis, a hardening of anti-immigration sentiment, and deepening communal segregation in many parts of the developed world, questions of the nature of home and homemaking are increasingly critical. This collection brings ethnographic insight into the practices of homemaking, exploring a diverse range of contexts ranging from economic migrants to new Chinese industrial cities, Jewish returnees from Israel to Ukraine, and young gay South Asians in London. While negotiating widely varying social-political contexts, these studies suggest an unavoidably multiple understanding of home, while provoking new understandings of the material and symbolic process of making oneself “at home.”

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This book examines experiences of home improvement in the UK and Aotearoa New Zealand, providing valuable insight into the ways in which people make and maintain home in social, material and economic context. Drawing on in-depth interviews, examining both DIY projects and projects carried out by professional handymen, Rosie Cox explores how home improvement fits into wider social relationships and structures of inequality. Consideration is given to the importance of such work for gender and national identities, and how these identities are related to material contexts and the forms and fabric of homes. The book also highlights how home improvement can be a rewarding and valuable form of work, as well as an unrewarding and alienating endeavour. It will be of interest to scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, sociology and human geography.

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This book is a brilliant use of metaphor that makes clear why the world leaves us feeling so uneasy!

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This book celebrates and captures examples of the excellent scholarship that Palgrave’s Health, Technology, and Society Series has published since 2006, and reflects on how the field has developed over this time. As a collection of readings drawn from twenty-two books, it is organized around five themes: Innovation, Responsibility, Locus of Care, Knowledge Production, and Regulation and Governance. Structured in this way, the book gives the reader a concise but nonetheless rich guide to the core issues and debates within the field. Complementing these narratives, the original authors have provided new reflection pieces on their texts and on their current work. This then is a book which in part looks back but also looks forward to emerging issues at the intersection of health, technology, and society. It uniquely encompasses and presents a range of expertise in a novel way that is both timely and accessible for students and others new to the field.

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This critical introduction to consumption and its geographies provides an engaged summary of the consumption literature and demonstrates that consumption is intimately related to the production of space in everyday life. In Geographies of Consumption Juliana Mansvelt provides readers with a detailed explanation of political-economic and social-cultural perspectives on consumption at different scales. She opens with overview chapters on the history and conceptualisation of consumption and moves on to thematic chapters on consumption spaces; the body and identity; commodity chains; globalization commercial cultures. The text is illustrated throughout with comparative case study-material and features boxes and annotated notes for further reading. A review of consumption from a spatial perspective, this critical analysis of the key debates is the first synoptic overview in the geographic literature. Geographies of Consumption will be widely used in modules in economic and social geography, and should be the core text for those with a focus on consumption

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This collection analyzes shifting relationships between gender and labour in post-Fordist times. Contingency creates a sexual contract in which attachments to work, mothering, entrepreneurship and investor subjectivity are the new regulatory ideals for women over a range of working arrangements, and across classed and raced dimensions.

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This book examines the transformations in home lives arising in later life and resulting from global migrations. It provides insight into the ways in which contemporary demographic processes of aging and migration shape the meaning, experience and making of home for those in older age. Chapters explore how home is negotiated in relation to possibilities for return to the "homeland," family networks, aging and health, care cultures and belonging. The book deliberately crosses emerging sub-fields in transnationalism studies by offering case studies on aging labour migrants, retirement migrants, and return migrants, as well as older people affected by the movement of others including family members and migrant care workers. The diversity of people’s experiences of home in later life is fully explored and the impact of social class, gender, and nationality, as well as the corporeal dimensions of older age, are all in evidence.

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Home is where the heart ought to be. But nowadays too many of us are missing the human connection and emotional replenishment that only a rewarding home life can bestow. Designer Rosanna Bowles wants to change that. In Coming Home, she shares a year-round plan for establishing traditions—and, in the process, making memories—that will restore home to its central place in your family’s life. Taking her cues from the seasons’ changing moods—spring’s awakening, summer’s vibrancy, fall’s bittersweet transition, and winter’s introspection—Bowles creates a calendar of activities, rituals, and celebrations that will bring you back home in the deepest and most fulfilling sense. And because the table is where family and beloved friends most often come together, she provides more than fifty favorite recipes—for simple family meals and sumptuous holiday feasts—that deliciously express each season’s character.

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