In the Land of Men

Read or download online In the Land of Men ebook full in format Pdf, ePub, Kindle, and many more. In the Land of Men written by Adrienne Miller, published by HarperCollins on 2020-02-11 with 352 pages for you to read. In the Land of Men is one from many Biography & Autobiography books that available for free in the amazon kindle unlimited, click Get Book to start reading and download books online free now. With Kindle Unlimited Free trial, you can read as many books as you want today.

In the Land of Men

In the Land of Men

  • Author : Adrienne Miller
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Pages : 352
  • Release Date : 2020-02-11

One of Vogue’s Best Books of the Year One of Esquire’s Best Books of the Year One of the Wall Street Journal’s Favorite Books of the Year One of the Most Anticipated Books of the Year: Vogue, Parade, Esquire, Bitch, and Maclean’s A New York Times and Washington Post Book to Watch A fiercely personal memoir about coming of age in the male-dominated literary world of the nineties, becoming the first female literary editor of Esquire, and Miller's personal and working relationship with David Foster Wallace A naive and idealistic twenty-two-year-old from the Midwest, Adrienne Miller got her lucky break when she was hired as an editorial assistant at GQ magazine in the mid-nineties. Even if its sensibilities were manifestly mid-century—the martinis, powerful male egos, and unquestioned authority of kings—GQ still seemed the red-hot center of the literary world. It was there that Miller began learning how to survive in a man’s world. Three years later, she forged her own path, becoming the first woman to take on the role of literary editor of Esquire, home to the male writers who had defined manhood itself— Hemingway, Mailer, and Carver. Up against this old world, she would soon discover that it wanted nothing to do with a “mere girl.” But this was also a unique moment in history that saw the rise of a new literary movement, as exemplified by McSweeney’s and the work of David Foster Wallace. A decade older than Miller, the mercurial Wallace would become the defining voice of a generation and the fiction writer she would work with most. He was her closest friend, confidant—and antagonist. Their intellectual and artistic exchange grew into a highly charged professional and personal relationship between the most prominent male writer of the era and a young woman still finding her voice. This memoir—a rich, dazzling story of power, ambition, and identity—ultimately asks the question “How does a young woman fit into this male culture and at what cost?” With great wit and deep intelligence, Miller presents an inspiring and moving portrayal of a young woman’s education in a land of men. “The memoir I’ve been waiting for: a bold, incisive, and illuminating story of a woman whose devotion to language and literature comes at a hideous cost. It’s Joanna Rakoff’s My Salinger Year updated for the age of She Said: a literary New York now long past; an intimate, fiercely realist portrait of a mythic literary figure; and now, a tender reckoning with possession, power, and what Jia Tolentino called the ‘Important, Inappropriate Literary Man.’ A poised and superbly perceptive narration of the problems of working with men, and of loving them.”— Eleanor Henderson, author of 10,000 Saints

Gordon King becomes lost in Cambodia and comes upon a lost civilization, a Land of Hidden Men.

GET BOOK

The year is 2021. No child has been born for twenty-five years. The human race faces extinction. Under the despotic rule of Xan Lyppiat, the Warden of England, the old are despairing and the young cruel. Theo Faren, a cousin of the Warden, lives a solitary life in this ominous atmosphere. That is, until a chance encounter with a young woman leads him into contact with a group of dissenters. Suddenly his life is changed irrevocably as he faces agonising choices which could affect the future of mankind. NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE

GET BOOK

The second book in the epic Ballantyne series Zouga was left alone, as alone in spirit as he had ever been in any of his wanderings across the vast African continent. He had spent almost the last penny he owned on these few square feet of yellow earth at the bottom of this hot and dusty pit. He had no men to help him work it, no experience, no capital.' A tribal battle. An Empire's war. Zouga Ballantyne has in his blood a fanatic's need to find diamonds, one that will take him to Southern Africa's most punishing places. Losing his wife to one of the many sicknesses that haunt the diamond mine camp, Zouga and his sons must find another way through the country, helping to build the British Empire, and developing their own form of civilisation in the face of tribal opposition. But the Ballantyne family success comes at a price -the sacrifice of the local Matabele tribe, who have tried to live alongside the colonists, but are slowly losing everything. In the face of exploitation, violence and greed, who will triumph in the land of ruthless men?

GET BOOK

In the latest book in the widely beloved No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series Precious Ramotswe takes on a case for a childhood friend, but when her inquiries attract the attention of a prominent politician she lands herself in more trouble than maybe even she can handle. Mma Ramotswe happily reconnects with an old friend when his teaching job brings him back to Gaborone. In the course of their conversations, though, Mma Ramotswe learns that Hope, one of their mutual acquaintances, has fallen on hard times. This initially comes as a shock to her, as the woman came from wealth. But when she learns that Hope has recently separated from her husband, a local politician with a less than stellar reputation, she becomes determined to find out the truth. Elsewhere, Charlie and Fanwell are also involved in tricky matters of the heart, as Queenie-Queenie, Charlie's girlfriend, seems to have transferred her affections to Fanwell. It's up to Mma Makutsi to set things right, but she may be too distracted by Violet Sephotho, who has somehow been appointed to the board of a charity. What is Violet up to now? As all of these mysteries are unravelled, Mma Ramotswe and the entire No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency will be reminded of the value of tried and true wisdom--she chooses to believe in goodness, that if our hearts are open, true equality can be found with one another. But in this world can that assumption be justified? It will take all her ingenuity and great moral sense to get to the heart of the matter.

GET BOOK

"At last, The Coast of Akron! Adrienne Miller is one of the wittiest and most humane writers we have, bringing to mind at once Dorothy Parker, Mary McCarthy, and M.F.K. Fisher." -Dave Eggers Adrienne Miller, in her dazzlingly ambitious and hilarious first novel, introduces us to the unforgettable Haven family of Akron, Ohio. This is not your typical Midwestern family, and Lowell Haven is a most unusual patriarch. He's a seducer, a wannabe aristocrat, a liar. Jenny, his former wife, was a brilliant artist, but is today a broken woman with a secret. In the thirty years since Lowell and Jenny met, Lowell has become a world-famous artist, known for portraits of his favorite subject-himself. But five years ago, Lowell mysteriously stopped painting and the world now demands to know: Why has Lowell Haven abandoned his art? The answer is Merit, Lowell and Jenny's daughter, who is running as fast as she can from her family. Fergus, Lowell's partner, Jenny's ex-best friend, and drama queen extraordinaire, dreams of luring Merit home: the sixty-five-room faux-Tudor mansion where he lives with Lowell. A lavish party for the Midwestern glitterati is the perfect excuse. But his delusions of grandeur loom over the gathering, and his decision to include a certain guest invites disaster. Stretching from mid-seventies London to the present-day Midwest, The Coast of Akron is a sharply funny and deeply heartbreaking story about the all-too-human urge to own what is unownable.

GET BOOK

Men in the Land is a compilation of stories that deal with real men. Men and their immovable foundations, their women, facing difficult and deadly circumstances, who understand the foundational basis of morality and decency, love of family, friends, and country. These men must deal with immorality, greed, and danger decisively, and sometimes violently, while maintaining their own integrity. Each man, in real life, must face similar decisions for himself. There are those who would destroy us. Men in the Land are the bulwark against destruction. Kender, Stepp, Openshaw, and Trapper White, their neighbors and friends, each, in their own way, are men who inspire us to fight, against all odds, for that which is rightfully ours. They irreversibly influence the world around them. Men in the Land are monuments to positive values, hard won, and honest achievement. They stand for something. They are granite, bigger than life, strong, and immovable. Our nation is today because there were Men in the Land.

GET BOOK

A riveting, deeply personal account of history in the making—from the president who inspired us to believe in the power of democracy #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAACP IMAGE AWARD NOMINEE • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • Jennifer Szalai, The New York Times • NPR • The Guardian • Marie Claire In the stirring, highly anticipated first volume of his presidential memoirs, Barack Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world, describing in strikingly personal detail both his political education and the landmark moments of the first term of his historic presidency—a time of dramatic transformation and turmoil. Obama takes readers on a compelling journey from his earliest political aspirations to the pivotal Iowa caucus victory that demonstrated the power of grassroots activism to the watershed night of November 4, 2008, when he was elected 44th president of the United States, becoming the first African American to hold the nation’s highest office. Reflecting on the presidency, he offers a unique and thoughtful exploration of both the awesome reach and the limits of presidential power, as well as singular insights into the dynamics of U.S. partisan politics and international diplomacy. Obama brings readers inside the Oval Office and the White House Situation Room, and to Moscow, Cairo, Beijing, and points beyond. We are privy to his thoughts as he assembles his cabinet, wrestles with a global financial crisis, takes the measure of Vladimir Putin, overcomes seemingly insurmountable odds to secure passage of the Affordable Care Act, clashes with generals about U.S. strategy in Afghanistan, tackles Wall Street reform, responds to the devastating Deepwater Horizon blowout, and authorizes Operation Neptune’s Spear, which leads to the death of Osama bin Laden. A Promised Land is extraordinarily intimate and introspective—the story of one man’s bet with history, the faith of a community organizer tested on the world stage. Obama is candid about the balancing act of running for office as a Black American, bearing the expectations of a generation buoyed by messages of “hope and change,” and meeting the moral challenges of high-stakes decision-making. He is frank about the forces that opposed him at home and abroad, open about how living in the White House affected his wife and daughters, and unafraid to reveal self-doubt and disappointment. Yet he never wavers from his belief that inside the great, ongoing American experiment, progress is always possible. This beautifully written and powerful book captures Barack Obama’s conviction that democracy is not a gift from on high but something founded on empathy and common understanding and built together, day by day.

GET BOOK

With the same unique vision that brought his now classic Mars trilogy to vivid life, bestselling author Kim Stanley Robinson boldly imagines an alternate history of the last seven hundred years. In his grandest work yet, the acclaimed storyteller constructs a world vastly different from the one we know. . . . “A thoughtful, magisterial alternate history from one of science fiction’s most important writers.”—The New York Times Book Review It is the fourteenth century and one of the most apocalyptic events in human history is set to occur—the coming of the Black Death. History teaches us that a third of Europe’s population was destroyed. But what if the plague had killed 99 percent of the population instead? How would the world have changed? This is a look at the history that could have been—one that stretches across centuries, sees dynasties and nations rise and crumble, and spans horrible famine and magnificent innovation. Through the eyes of soldiers and kings, explorers and philosophers, slaves and scholars, Robinson navigates a world where Buddhism and Islam are the most influential and practiced religions, while Christianity is merely a historical footnote. Probing the most profound questions as only he can, Robinson shines his extraordinary light on the place of religion, culture, power—and even love—in this bold New World. “Exceptional and engrossing.”—New York Post “Ambitious . . . ingenious.”—Newsday

GET BOOK

Michael Dante played the title role in Winterhawk (1975), a Western about a legendary Blackfoot Chief’s character and his principles. In this novella sequel, he pens an ageless saga about ruthless railroad executives trying to assassinate him in order to build their railroad directly through his territory, taking the Blackfoot land without provocation. Winterhawk and his tribe remain strong as long as they can, to protect the land of their people, the land they call home, before the invasion of progress imposes itself on America. This inspiring story of a brave man, who stands up to and fight against those who have their own agenda for his land, evokes the nostalgic atmosphere of Western series that Dante frequently appeared in during American television’s Golden Era, such as Death Valley Days, The Big Valley, Daniel Boone, Custer, The Texan, Bonanza, Maverick, and Cheyenne.

GET BOOK

Recipient of the 2014 American Academy of Arts and Letters Rosenthal Foundation Award A major debut from an award-winning writer—an epic family saga set against the magic and the rhythms of the Virgin Islands. In the early 1900s, the Virgin Islands are transferred from Danish to American rule, and an important ship sinks into the Caribbean Sea. Orphaned by the shipwreck are two sisters and their half brother, now faced with an uncertain identity and future. Each of them is unusually beautiful, and each is in possession of a particular magic that will either sink or save them. Chronicling three generations of an island family from 1916 to the 1970s, Land of Love and Drowning is a novel of love and magic, set against the emergence of Saint Thomas into the modern world. Uniquely imagined, with echoes of Toni Morrison, Gabriel García Márquez, and the author’s own Caribbean family history, the story is told in a language and rhythm that evoke an entire world and way of life and love. Following the Bradshaw family through sixty years of fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, love affairs, curses, magical gifts, loyalties, births, deaths, and triumphs, Land of Love and Drowning is a gorgeous, vibrant debut by an exciting, prizewinning young writer.

GET BOOK

This is written from memory, unfortunately. If I could have brought with me the material I so carefully prepared, this would be a very different story. Whole books full of notes, carefully copied records, firsthand descriptions, and the pictures—that’s the worst loss. We had some bird’s-eyes of the cities and parks; a lot of lovely views of streets, of buildings, outside and in, and some of those gorgeous gardens, and, most important of all, of the women themselves.

GET BOOK

On a white-hot day in Tripoli, Libya, in the summer of 1979, 9-year-old Suleiman is shopping in the market square with his mother. His father is away on business—except that Suleiman is sure he has just seen him, standing across the street wearing a pair of dark glasses. But why doesn’t he come over when he knows Suleiman’s mother is falling apart? Whispers intensify around Suleiman as his friend’s father disappears and his mother frantically burns his father’s books. As Suleiman begins to wonder whether his father has gone for good, it feels as if the walls of his home will break with the secrets held within.

GET BOOK

'Although he feared death, he could not stop. 'If I stopped now, after coming all this way - well, they'd call me an idiot!' A pair of short stories about greed, charity, life and death from one of Russia's most influential writers and thinkers. Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th-century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). Tolstoy's works available in Penguin Classics are Anna Karenina, War and Peace, Childhood, Boyhood, Youth,The Cossacks and Other Stories, The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories, What is art?, Resurrection, The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories, Master and Man and Other Stories, How Much Land Does A Man Need? & Other Stories, A Confession and Other Religious Writings and Last steps: The Late Writings of Leo Tolstoy.

GET BOOK

Shots rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion in the misty,early morning hours of May 2, 1981. Was it murder or self-defense? For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares. John Berendt's sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction. Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case. It is a spellbinding story peopled by a gallery of remarkable characters: the well-bred society ladies of the Married Woman's Card Club; the turbulent young redneck gigolo; the hapless recluse who owns a bottle of poison so powerful it could kill every man, woman, and child in Savannah; the aging and profane Southern belle who is the "soul of pampered self-absorption"; the uproariously funny black drag queen; the acerbic and arrogant antiques dealer; the sweet-talking, piano-playing con artist; young blacks dancing the minuet at the black debutante ball; and Minerva, the voodoo priestess who works her magic in the graveyard at midnight. These and other Savannahians act as a Greek chorus, with Berendt revealing the alliances, hostilities, and intrigues that thrive in a town where everyone knows everyone else. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a sublime and seductive reading experience. Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this enormously engaging portrait of a most beguiling Southern city has become a modern classic.

GET BOOK

The award-winning, #1 internationally bestselling new novel by the author of The Perfect Nanny that “lays bare women’s intimate, lacerating experience of war” (The New York Times Book Review) After World War II, Mathilde leaves France for Morocco to be with her husband, whom she met while he was fighting for the French army. A spirited young woman, she now finds herself a farmer’s wife, her vitality sapped by the isolation, the harsh climate, and the mistrust she inspires as a foreigner. But she refuses to be subjugated or confined to her role as mother of a growing family. As tensions mount between the Moroccans and the French colonists, Mathilde’s fierce desire for autonomy parallels her adopted country’s fight for independence in this lush and transporting novel about race, resilience, and women’s empowerment.

GET BOOK

Based entirely on unpublished primary sources, this remarkable book -the first authoritative history of modern Tibet - is also the first to provide detailed accounts of: * The covert political manoeuverings in Tibet and the role of the Tibetan, Chinese and British governments; * The Dalai Lama's escape in 1959; * The CIA's involvement and the establishment of a secret military base in the Nepalese Himalayas; * The British government lying to the UN and Douglas Hurd's role in that process; * The power struggles during th Cultural Revolution and the mass uprising against the Chinese that has remained secret until now.

GET BOOK

This tale of a conflicted family living on a kibbutz in Israel just before the Six-Day War is “Oz's strangest, riskiest, and richest novel.” —The Washington Post Book World On a kibbutz, the country’s founders and their children struggle to come to terms with their land and with each other. The messianic father exults in accomplishments that had once been only dreams; the son longs to establish an identity apart from his father; the fragile young wife is out of touch with reality; and the gifted and charismatic “outsider” seethes with emotion. Through the interplay of these brilliantly realized characters, Oz evokes a drama that is chillingly, strikingly universal. “[Oz is] a peerless, imaginative chronicler of his country’s inner and outer transformations.” —Independent (UK)

GET BOOK

Moby-Dick is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville. The story tells the adventures of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaling ship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab seeks one specific whale, Moby-Dick, a white whale of tremendous size and ferocity. Comparatively few whaling ships know of Moby-Dick, and fewer yet have encountered him. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg. Ahab intends to exact revenge. The novel was a commercial failure and out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891, but during the 20th century its reputation as a Great American Novel was established. The product of a year and a half of writing, the book draws on Melville's experience at sea, on his reading in whaling literature, and on literary inspirations such as Shakespeare and the Bible. The detailed and realistic descriptions of whale hunting and of extracting whale oil, as well as life aboard ship among a culturally diverse crew, are mixed with exploration of class and social status, good and evil, and the existence of God. In addition to narrative prose, Melville uses styles and literary devices ranging from songs, poetry, and catalogs to Shakespearean stage directions, soliloquies, and asides.

GET BOOK

“[An] entertaining epic fantasy.” —Kirkus Reviews “Action-packed …. Rice's writing is solid and the premise intriguing.” --Publishers Weekly “The beginnings of something remarkable are there.” --San Francisco Book Review A LAND OF FIRE is Book #12 in the Bestselling series THE SORCERER'S RING, which begins with A QUEST OF HEROES (book #1), a free download! In A LAND OF FIRE (BOOK #12 IN THE SORCERER’S RING), Gwendolyn and her people find themselves surrounded on the Upper Isles, besieged by Romulus’ dragons and his million man army. All seems lost—when salvation comes from an unlikely source. Gwendolyn is determined to find her baby, lost at sea, and to lead her nation-in-exile to a new home. She travels across foreign and exotic seas, encountering unthinkable dangers, rebellion and starvation, as they sail for dream of a safe harbor. Thorgrin’s finally meets his mother in the Land of the Druids, and their meeting will change his life forever, make him stronger than he has ever been. With a new quest, he embarks, determined to rescue Gwendolyn, to find his baby, and to fulfill his destiny. In an epic battle of dragons and of men, Thor will be tested in every way; as he battles monsters and lays down his life for his brothers, he will dig deeper to become the great warrior he was meant to be. In the Southern Isles, Erec lies dying, and Alistair, accused of his murder, must do what she can to both save Erec and absolve herself of guilt. A civil war erupts in a power struggle for the throne, and Alistair finds herself caught in the middle, with her fate, and Erec’s, hanging in the balance. Romulus remains intent on destroying Gwendolyn, Thorgrin, and what remains of the Ring; but his moon cycle is coming to an end, and his power will be severely tested. Meanwhile, in the Northern province of the Empire, a new hero is rising: Darius, a 15 year old warrior, who is determined to break off the chains of slavery and rise up amongst his people. But the Northern Capitol is run by Volusia, a 18 year old girl, famed for her beauty—and famed also her barbaric cruelty. Will Gwen and her people survive? Will Guwayne be found? Will Romulus crush the Ring? Will Erec live? Will Thorgrin return in time? With its sophisticated world-building and characterization, A LAND OF FIRE is an epic tale of friends and lovers, of rivals and suitors, of knights and dragons, of intrigues and political machinations, of coming of age, of broken hearts, of deception, ambition and betrayal. It is a tale of honor and courage, of fate and destiny, of sorcery. It is a fantasy that brings us into a world we will never forget, and which will appeal to all ages and genders. Books #13--#17 in the series are now also available! “A spirited fantasy ….Only the beginning of what promises to be an epic young adult series.” --Midwest Book Review “A quick and easy read…you have to read what happens next and you don’t want to put it down.” --FantasyOnline.net “It will keep you entertained for hours, and will satisfy all ages.” --Books and Movie Reviews

GET BOOK

Basil Elton is a lighthouse keeper who has followed in his father’s and grandfather's footsteps – all of them have taken care of this very lighthouse. Elton is still fascinated by the ocean: blue, green, grey, white, or black; smooth, ruffled, or mountainous – the ocean is never silent. But Elton also has a special dream. He dreams about a magical white ship that would take him to places, far away from the lighthouse... H.P. Lovecraft (1890–1937) was an American horror writer. His best known works include ‘The Call of Cthulhu’ and ‘the Mountains of Madness’. Most of his work was originally published in pulp magazines, and Lovecraft rose into fame only after his death at the age of 46. He has had a great influence in both horror and science fiction genres.

GET BOOK

In the third book in the New York Times bestselling series by Chris Colfer, the Brothers Grimm have a warning for the Land of Stories. Conner Bailey thinks his fairy-tale adventures are behind him--until he discovers a mysterious clue left by the famous Brothers Grimm. With help from his classmate Bree and the outlandish Mother Goose, Conner sets off on a mission across Europe to crack a two-hundred-year-old code. Meanwhile, Alex Bailey is training to become the next Fairy Godmother...but her attempts at granting wishes never go as planned. Will she ever be truly ready to lead the Fairy Council? When all signs point to disaster for the Land of Stories, Conner and Alex must join forces with their friends and enemies to save the day. But nothing can prepare them for the coming battle...or for the secret that will change the twins' lives forever. The third book in the bestselling Land of Stories series puts the twins to the test as they must bring two worlds together!

GET BOOK

An NPR Best Book of the Year A 2020 International Latino Book Award Finalist An Entertainment Weekly, The Millions, and LitHub Most Anticipated Book of the Year This unforgettable memoir from a prize-winning poet about growing up undocumented in the United States recounts the sorrows and joys of a family torn apart by draconian policies and chronicles one young man’s attempt to build a future in a nation that denies his existence. “You were not a ghost even though an entire country was scared of you. No one in this story was a ghost. This was not a story.” When Marcelo Hernandez Castillo was five years old and his family was preparing to cross the border between Mexico and the United States, he suffered temporary, stress-induced blindness. Castillo regained his vision, but quickly understood that he had to move into a threshold of invisibility before settling in California with his parents and siblings. Thus began a new life of hiding in plain sight and of paying extraordinarily careful attention at all times for fear of being truly seen. Before Castillo was one of the most celebrated poets of a generation, he was a boy who perfected his English in the hopes that he might never seem extraordinary. With beauty, grace, and honesty, Castillo recounts his and his family’s encounters with a system that treats them as criminals for seeking safe, ordinary lives. He writes of the Sunday afternoon when he opened the door to an ICE officer who had one hand on his holster, of the hours he spent making a fake social security card so that he could work to support his family, of his father’s deportation and the decade that he spent waiting to return to his wife and children only to be denied reentry, and of his mother’s heartbreaking decision to leave her children and grandchildren so that she could be reunited with her estranged husband and retire from a life of hard labor. Children of the Land distills the trauma of displacement, illuminates the human lives behind the headlines and serves as a stunning meditation on what it means to be a man and a citizen.

GET BOOK

In the years after the Final War, the Council of Women decide to secede from men. They create a world of their own away from men, where they can raise their children without fear. Once a year men may visit briefly to procreate. Boys are sent to the Land of Men when they reach puberty. At eleven, Bergman was sent across the sea and placed with his fathers, Spencer and Harris. Years later, he meets Hastings at the Beach Festival, an annual event for young men. It’s love at first sight for Bergman. But the course of true love never runs smoothly. In time Hastings desires a son, a subject Bergman paid little thought to. Yet their son Taylor brings great joy to their lives. Life is further complicated when Hastings is chosen to travel to the Land of Women to father children. He wants to accept, but Bergman can’t understand why he would consider going. Isn’t he happy with what he already has? If he goes, what will that do to their relationship? To their future? Is this a betrayal, or is it something else?

GET BOOK

Growing up in the Land of Tattooed Men serves as an account of one young mans impressions, observations and judgments as he experiences both the immediate and the farreaching effects of the Vietnam War. The authors goal is to use the story as a means of sharing a little of himself with his current and future grandchildren. The author, a retired geothermal power plant operator, began this project upon learning of his daughters first pregnancy.

GET BOOK

The Turner Family continue their adventures around the world. The family travels to Mexico and celebrates Cinco de Mayo with close friends and the people of Mexico. Cinco de Mayo means 'The Fifth of May' and is in recognition of the Mexican Constitution. The people celebrate with festivals, carnivals, fireworks, food, dance, music and costume. People from all over the world attend these festivities yearly. The three Turner teens and their friends visit the Aztec ruins and get trapped in the Land of the Aztecs. There is danger everywhere as the teens are in the middle of an impending war between two kingdoms in which two kings are determined to kill each other and take each others people as sacrifices for the altar. The love between a princess and a prince is the only thing that stands in the way of thousands of people being killed and both kingdoms being torn apart. It is their love that can stop blood from being spilled on the altar. Can the 'Teen Archaeologists' help the young lovers unite the kingdoms before the two kings destroy them all? And even if they do, will the gods in the heavens come down to earth and destroy them all? Sample from the book- Back at the palace, the Sorceress Inancu walked onto the balcony to watch the battle of the Aztec warriors. Princess Anacoana rushed over to her. Inancu, Anacoana cried out. The God of War Monchipotl is going to destroy them all. Chantico is out there on the battle ground. He will die unless you help him. Help him. Please!" "Do not fret, princess," Inancu said calmly. "I shall call upon the Goddess of War Tipanza to come forth and destroy Monchipotl. It is the only way he can be defeated. No human can kill a giant. He can only be destroyed by another god." Inancu looked up into the sky. She held her hands up and closed her eyes. She called forth the Goddess of War. Tipanza heard her thoughts and appeared in the sky. She looked down at the battle between the Aztec warriors and her enemy Monchipotl and smiled. The two gods of war hated each other. The Goddess of War Tipanza appeared on earth in the Land of the Azteca, ready to destroy Monchipotl. The God of War Monchipotl smiled and laughed out loud when he saw Tipanza standing before him. The ground shook as the powerful giant spoke. "Tipanza, you have come on behalf of these humans to battle me? Do you actually think that you can defeat me? You are a goddess of war. Yes. You are a warrior. But you are still a mere female. Go back into the heavens or I shall destroy you." "I shall return to the heavens when you are dead, Monchipotl," she replied with confidence. "Very well then, if that's the way you want it. We shall do things the hard way. Now you shall die," he said angrily. The Aztec warriors backed away from the two giants and ran toward the Kingdom of the Tesoshtilandt. King Moctuma invited King Mapich and his four sons and head Aztec warriors inside the palace. When Chantico and Anacoana saw each other they ran and embraced. Queen Neca and Princess Tayanna smiled.

GET BOOK

As the American Southwest faces its deepest drought in history, this book explores the provocative notion of “water bankruptcy” with a view towards emphasizing the diversity and complexity of water issues in this region. It bridges between the narratives of growth and the strategies or policies adopted to pursue competing agendas and circumvent the inevitable. A window of opportunity provided by this current long-term drought may be used to induce change by dealing with threats that derive from imbalances between growth patterns and available resources, the primary cause of scarcity. A first of its kind, this book was developed through close collaboration of a broad range of natural scientists, social scientists, and resource managers from Europe and United States. It constitutes a collective elaboration of a transdisciplinary approach to unveiling the inner workings of how water was fought for, allocated and used in the American Southwest, with a focus on Arizona. Specifically, it offers an innovative scientific perspective that produces a critical diagnostic evaluation of water management, with a particular view to identifying risks for the Tucson region that is facing continuous urban sprawl and economic growth. The book offers a diversity of complementary perspectives, including a statement of natural resources, biodiversity and their management, an analysis of water policy and its history, and a statement of ecosystem services in the context of both local biodiversity and also the economic activities that sustain economic growth. Finally, it presents a concerted effort to explore the interplay between a variety of related scientific disciplines and frameworks including climatology, hydrology, water management, ecosystem services, societal metabolism, political economy and social science.

GET BOOK

Men in the Land is a compilation of stories that deal with real men. Men and their immovable foundations, their women, facing difficult and deadly circumstances, who understand the foundational basis of morality and decency, love of family, friends, and country. These men must deal with immorality, greed, and danger decisively, and sometimes violently, while maintaining their own integrity. Each man, in real life, must face similar decisions for himself. There are those who would destroy us. Men in the Land are the bulwark against destruction. Kender, Stepp, Openshaw, and Trapper White, their neighbors and friends, each, in their own way, are men who inspire us to fight, against all odds, for that which is rightfully ours. They irreversibly influence the world around them. Men in the Land are monuments to positive values, hard won, and honest achievement. They stand for something. They are granite, bigger than life, strong, and immovable. Our nation is today because there were Men in the Land.

GET BOOK

BEFORE time was, and while yet the world was uncreated, chaos reigned. The earth and the waters, the light and the darkness, the stars and the firmament, were intermingled in a vapoury liquid. All things were formless and confused. No creature existed; phantom shapes moved as clouds on the ruffled surface of a sea. It was the birth-time of the gods. The first deity sprang from an immense bulrush-bud, which rose, spear-like, in the midst of the boundless disorder. Other gods were born, but three generations passed before the actual separation of the atmosphere from the more solid earth. Finally, where the tip of the bulrush points upward, the Heavenly Spirits appeared. From this time their kingdom was divided from the lower world where chaos still prevailed. To the fourth pair of gods it was given to create the earth. These two beings were the powerful God of the Air, Izanagi, and the fair Goddess of the Clouds, Izanami. From them sprang all life. Now Izanagi and Izanami wandered on the Floating Bridge of Heaven. This bridge spanned the gulf between heaven and the unformed world; it was upheld in the air, and it stood secure. The God of the Air spoke to the Goddess of the Clouds: ÒThere must needs be a kingdom beneath us, let us visit it.Ó When he had so said, he plunged his jewelled spear into the seething mass below. The drops that fell from the point of the spear congealed and became the island of Onogoro. Thereupon the Earth-Makers descended, and called up a high mountain peak, on whose summit could rest one end of the Heavenly Bridge, and around which the whole world should revolve.

GET BOOK

This early work by William Morris was originally published in 1899 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. William Morris was born in London, England in 1834. Arguably best known as a textile designer, he founded a design partnership which deeply influenced the decoration of churches and homes during the early 20th century. However, he is also considered an important Romantic writer and pioneer of the modern fantasy genre, being a direct influence on authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien. As well as fiction, Morris penned poetry and essays. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

GET BOOK

In the spring of 2004 - after living in Tokyo, Japan for over three years pursuing a career as a freelance musician - science fiction and fantasy author Domenico Italo Composto-Hart set off on a half-year backpacking journey through the lands of East and Southeast Asia, Siberia, Central Russia, the Baltic states, the Nordic countries, and Eastern and Western Europe. Traveling by foot, bus, train, and boat - and seeing the world through the analytical lens of anthropology, archaeology, and economics - Domenico documents, researches, and deciphers the developing nations he encounters as they rise through the turbulence of unregulated Western capitalism and globalization. Travels in the Land of Hunger is the author's reflective account of the dark, long-lasting impact of Western colonialism and imperialism, the Vietnam War, the Khmer Rouge regime, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the sex tourism and sex trafficking industries in Southeast and East Asia. It is also a narrative of finding exotic beauty, inspiration, inner strength, and unexpected love.

GET BOOK

Each book in this series contains a concise yet interesting record of a specific period in American history—always explaining the Catholic influence of religion, culture and morality. Every private Catholic school, home-schooling family and library will benefit from these Catholic textbooks. Book 2, most often used in Grade 5, begins with Columbus arriving in the New World, ending with the French and Indian War.

GET BOOK

Gordon King becomes lost in Cambodia and comes upon a lost civilization, a Land of Hidden Men.

GET BOOK

"The Land of Strong Men" by A. M. Chisholm. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

GET BOOK

The Land of Strong Men is a western novel by Arthur Murray Chisholm. Chisholm, also known as Bob Chisholm later in life, was an author of Western fiction. He also served as government agent, coroner, police magistrate, and Justice of the Peace in British Columbia. Excerpt: "It was light, but not yet day. The shadows of the night seemed to linger, to retreat with reluctance; and as they were beaten back by the sun, still far below the eastern curve of the earth and further blockaded by giant mountain ranges also to the eastward, the clinging, gray morning mists of early Fall came to replace them. In the pallid light, a-swim with vapor, objects loomed gigantic and grotesque. The house which stood among the mists was of squared timbers, mortised and fitted..."

GET BOOK

Beyond its housing estates and identikit high streets there is another Britain. This is the Britain of mist-drenched forests and unpredictable sea-frets: of wraith-like fog banks, druidic mistletoe and peculiar creatures that lurk, half-unseen, in the undergrowth, tantalising and teasing just at the periphery of human vision. How have the remarkably persistent folkloric traditions of the British Isles formed and been formed by the psyches of those who inhabit them? In this sparkling new history, Carolyne Larrington explores the diverse ways in which a myriad of fantastical beings has moulded the nation's cultural history. Fairies, elves and goblins here tread purposefully, sometimes malignly, over an eerie landscape that also conceals brownies, selkies, trows, knockers, boggarts, land-wights, Jack o'Lanterns, Barguests, the sinister Nuckleavee and Black Shuck: terrifying hell-hound of the Norfolk coast with eyes of burning coal. Ranging from Shetland to Jersey and from Ireland to East Anglia, while evoking the Wild Hunt, the ghostly bells of Lyonesse and the dread fenlands haunted by Grendel, this is a book that will captivate all those who long for the wild places: the mountains and chasms where giants lie in wait

GET BOOK

On an expedition to Westland in search of timber, Thora Thorvinnsdottir continues to be caught in the web of her estranged husband’s cruel animosity. Thora’s countrymen abandon her in a narrow escape from an ambush by a band of native Westlanders. Stranded in an unfamiliar land when their ship departs, Thora nearly succumbs to despair. Then she discovers that Elkimu, the Norsemen’s young Westlander captive, has also been left behind. Over time, what has begun as a liaison necessary for survival evolves into love. When Thora returns with Elkimu to Unamakik, his homeland, she devotes herself wholeheartedly to integrating with the Ellenu people and culture. When Elkimu’s family ultimately banishes her, she returns to her own people only to discover that her name does not, in fact, reflect who she truly is. Thora finds herself torn between two worlds—and rejected by both. Thora’s quest for love and an ever-elusive sense of belonging leads to intimacy and alienation, to birth and rebirth, and to the clashing of worlds—one world in which she sojourns, and the other she finds within herself, from the land of fog to clear skies.

GET BOOK

The Dead Have No Love for the Living In the Land of Dead Horses tells the story of Texas Ranger Jewel T. Lightfoot’s pursuit of and confrontation with a resurrected horror from another age—a manifestation of the Mayan god of darkness, unearthed from its subterranean crypt in the wastelands of the Chihuahuan Desert and set loose on an unsuspecting world. Lightfoot, a hard-drinking Texas Ranger, is aided by an aging silver miner named Ernesto Zavala and his grandson Antonio, a rangy firebrand who longs to free his people from the rule of Porfirio Diaz’s corrupt Mexican government. Together, these unlikely heroes face off against a sinister German academic, a trio of religious fanatics who wants to restore the glory of the Mayan empire, and a horror from the depths of history that grows stronger with each setting sun. ​Join Jewel Lightfoot in what Kirkus Reviews calls "a paranormal whodunit that offers a gripping battle between good and evil." But be careful: Not everyone who rides out of Austin in the fall of 1908 is going to make it back alive.

GET BOOK

Twenty-five-year-old Anna—restless, famished and emotionally numb—is following the long-cold trail of her father, a celebrated luthier, whose death has always haunted her. She's tracked his former business partner to a sailboat on Bellingham Bay, determined to pry from the old man the secrets of their guitarmaking trade, and maybe a few answers about her father. Anna catches an echo of her musical father in Arlan, guitar player for a local band. Soon she's living on his sofa, hanging out with his girlfriend—having friends for the first time, even. And if Anna's new friends do drugs, read her journal and leave open a few too many bedroom doors, who's to say they aren't real friends? And if Anna has feelings for Arlan, who's to say where her loyalty lies? During a single summer's worth of days, gin-soaked and colored with longing, Anna rediscovers her senses, shut down since her father's death, and finds that the only way to get free of her past is to embrace it.

GET BOOK