St. Ivo

Read or download online St. Ivo ebook full in format Pdf, ePub, Kindle, and many more. St. Ivo written by Joanna Hershon, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on 2020-04-14 with 224 pages for you to read. St. Ivo is one from many Fiction books that available for free in the amazon kindle unlimited, click Get Book to start reading and download books online free now. With Kindle Unlimited Free trial, you can read as many books as you want today.

St. Ivo

St. Ivo

  • Author : Joanna Hershon
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Fiction
  • Publisher : Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Pages : 224
  • Release Date : 2020-04-14

"Hershon maintains a quiet terror throughout this slim, eccentric novel. . . Fiction full of complexity, devoted to reality. And in the end, a larger sense of purpose crashes down in a satisfying burst." --Danya Kukafka, The New York Times Book Review Over the course of a weekend, two couples reckon with the long-hidden secrets that have shaped their families, in a charged, poignant novel of motherhood and friendship It’s the end of summer when we meet Sarah, the end of summer and the middle of her life, the middle of her career (she hopes it’s not the end), the middle of her marriage (recently repaired). And despite the years that have passed since she last saw her daughter, she is still very much in the middle of figuring out what happened to Leda, what role she played, and how she will let that loss affect the rest of her life. Enter a mysterious stranger on a train, an older man taking the subway to Brooklyn who sees right into her.Then a mugging, her phone stolen, and with it any last connection to Leda. And then an invitation, friends from the past and a weekend in the country with their new, unexpected baby. Over the course of three hot September days, the two couples try to reconnect. Events that have been set in motion, circumstances and feelings kept hidden, rise to the surface, forcing each to ask not just how they ended up where they are, but how they ended up who they are. Unwinding like a suspense novel, Joanna Hershon's St. Ivo is a powerful investigation into the meaning of choice and family, whether we ever know the people closest to us, and how, when someone goes missing from our lives, we can ever let them go.

Negotiating the Art of Fatherhood in Late Medieval and Early Modern Italy examines contested notions of fatherhood in written and visual texts during the development of the mercantile economy in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Italy. It analyzes debates about the household and community management of wealth, emotion, and trade in luxury “goods,” including enslaved women, as moral questions. Juliann Vitullo considers how this mercantile economy affected paternity and the portraits of ideal fatherhood, which in some cases reconceived the role of fathers and in others reconfirmed traditional notions of paternal authority.

GET BOOK

Presenting the work of a highly innovative partnership between the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education and eight secondary schools, this book explores this networked learning community which has helped to define the use and production of educational knowledge and research within and between various partners. This book examines the central questions and gives examples of the outcomes of the development that will assist any researchers, especially teachers undertaking research, to develop school-university partnerships. Stories and examples from practitioners and others who worked directly in and with schools are presented throughout the book. It will appeal to a wide audience of practitioners and academics, and to all who are interested in how research and enquiry can be used to support the development of practice in schools.

GET BOOK

The Legend of St Yves is not widely known in Britain, even though he is the patron saint of lawyers (among other things). In this informative account, Bryan Gibson places St Yves - born Erwan Helouri - on a par with Robin Hood, Jessie James and Ned Kelly in terms of their appeal to various national psyches - and up there alongside Joan of Arc and Bernadette of Lourdes as regards his native France. But whilst conventional outlaws used bows, arrows, six-guns and bullets to ‘rob the rich to help the poor’, St Yves challenged the poverty and social inequality which he saw as the root of many a prosecution or claim via argument, debate, reason and consensus. At a time when bribery and corruption was rife, St Yves waged an historic struggle to enhance the fairness of court and other proceedings and their outcomes. Hailing St Yves as an icon of justice, counselling, mediation and reform, Bryan Gibson explains why Erwan Helouri deserves to be better known, including for the values of decency, integrity and ethics that his approach to resolving conflict conveys. The result is not just a fascinating portrayal of the man but a work that will serve as an encouragement to anyone who believes that there are better ways of doing justice. Building on connections across time, place and elements of the supernatural,Law, Justice and Mediation: The Legend of St Yves also stands in its own right as an enlightening and compelling tale. A filip for all proponents of Restorative Justice - showing that such ideas have existed over time and place.

GET BOOK

Magic, both benevolent (white) and malign (black), has been practiced in the British Isles since at least the Iron Age (800 BCE–CE 43). “Curse tablets”—metal plates inscribed with curses intended to harm specific people—date from the Roman Empire. The Anglo-Saxons who settled in England in the fifth and sixth centuries used ritual curses in documents, and wrote spells and charms. When they became Christians in the seventh century, the new “magicians” were saints, who performed miracles. When William of Normandy became king in 1066, there was a resurgence of belief in magic. The Church was able to quell the fear of magicians, but the Reformation saw its revival, with numerous witchcraft trials in the late 16th and 17th centuries.

GET BOOK

How to Read Architecture is based on the fundamental premise that reading and interpreting architecture is something we already do, and that close observation matters. This book enhances this skill so that given an unfamiliar building, you will have the tools to understand it and to be inspired by it. Author Paulette Singley encourages you to misread, closely read, conventionally read, and unconventionally read architecture to stimulate your creative process. This book explores three essential ways to help you understand architecture: reading a building from the outside-in, from the inside-out, and from the position of out-and-out, or formal, architecture. This book erodes boundaries between the frequently compartmentalized fields of interior design, landscape design, and building design with chapters exploring concepts of terroir, scenography, criticality, atmosphere, tectonics, inhabitation, type, form, and enclosure. Using examples and case studies that span a wide range of historical and global precedents, Singley addresses the complex interaction among the ways a building engages its context, addresses its performative exigencies, and operates as an autonomous aesthetic object. Including over 300 images, this book is an essential read for both undergraduate and postgraduate students of architecture with a global focus on the interpretation of buildings in their context.

GET BOOK

Soldiers of the Middle Ages faced razor-sharp swords and axes that could slice through flesh with gruesome ease, while spears and arrows were made to puncture both armor and the wearer, and even more sinister means of causing harm produced burns and crush injuries. These casualties of war during the 500-year period between the ninth and thirteenth centuries in Northern and Western Europe are the focus of Brian Burfield’s study, but they represent just a portion of the story – disease, disability, disfigurement, damaged minds all played their roles in this awful reality. Surgical methods are described in the book, as are the fixes for fractured skulls, broken bones and damaged teeth. Disfiguring scars and disabling injuries are examined alongside the contemporary attitudes towards them. Also investigated are illnesses like dysentery and St Anthony’s Fire, plus infected wounds which were often more deadly than the weapons of the age. A final chapter on the psychological trauma caused by war is included and contains a significant focus on the world of the Vikings. Brian Burfield’s account features many individual cases, extracting their stories of wounds, sickness and death from chronicles, miracle collections, surgeries, government records and other documents. The prose, poetry and literature of the period are also of great value in bringing these cases to life, as is the evidence provided by modern archaeological and historical scholarship.

GET BOOK

Britain’s Pilgrim Places captures the spirit of 2,000 years of history, heritage and wonder. It is the complete guide to every spiritual treasure, including 500 enchanting holy places throughout England, Wales and Scotland and covers all major pilgrimage routes.

GET BOOK

The origin of the names of many English towns, hamlets and villages date as far back as Saxon times, when kings like Alfred the Great established fortified borough towns to defend against the Danes. A number of settlements were established and named by French Normans following the Conquest. Many are even older and are derived from Roman placenames. Some hark back to the Vikings who invaded our shores and established settlements in the eighth and ninth centuries. Most began as simple descriptions of the location; some identified its founder, marked territorial limits, or gave tribal people a sense of their place in the grand scheme of things. Whatever their derivation, placenames are inextricably bound up in our history and they tell us a great deal about the place where we live.

GET BOOK

The Use of Hereford, a local variation of the Roman rite, was one of the diocesan liturgies of medieval England before their abolition and replacement by the Book of Common Prayer in 1549. Unlike the widespread Use of Sarum, the Use of Hereford was confined principally to its diocese, which helped to maintain its individuality until the Reformation. This study seeks to catalogue and evaluate all the known surviving sources of the Use of Hereford, with particular reference to the missals and gradual, which so far have received little attention. In addition to these a variety of other material has been examined, including a number of little-known or unknown important fragments of early Hereford service-books dismembered at the Reformation and now hidden away as binding or other scrap in libraries and record offices. This is the fullest examination of Hereford liturgical sources ever undertaken and may stimulate similar and much-needed studies of other diocesan uses, in particular Sarum and York. As well as describing in detail the various manuscript sources, the rare single edition printed Hereford texts, the missals and breviaries, are also discussed. Unlike books of the Sarum and York rites, these ’one-offs’ were never revised and reissued. In addition to the examination of these sources, William Smith discusses the possible origins of the rite and provides an analysis of the Hereford liturgical calendar, of the festa, including those of the cathedral’s patron St Ethelbert and the no less famous St Thomas Cantilupe, that helped to make Hereford use so distinctive.

GET BOOK

Widely acknowledged as the essential reference work for this period, this volume brings together more than 700 articles written by 150 top scholars that cover the people, places, activities, and creations of the Anglo-Saxons. The only reference work to cover the history, archaeology, arts, architecture, literatures, and languages of England from the Roman withdrawal to the Norman Conquest (c.450 – 1066 AD) Includes over 700 alphabetical entries written by 150 top scholars covering the people, places, activities, and creations of the Anglo-Saxons Updated and expanded with 40 brand-new entries and a new appendix detailing "English Archbishops and Bishops, c.450-1066" Accompanied by maps, line drawings, photos, a table of "English Rulers, c.450-1066," and a headword index to facilitate searching An essential reference tool, both for specialists in the field, and for students looking for a thorough grounding in key topics of the period

GET BOOK

Seeking a quiet spot to write his memoirs, Laurent de Rodergues secludes himself in Saint-Chartier, a village in the heart of France where his grandfather once lived. Yet his tranquil life is soon disturbed by Carlos, an eccentric Irish-Argentine millionaire determined to give the town’s medieval château a costly and controversial makeover. Where some see a benefactor, others see a high-handed intruder whose endless renovations have left their music festival without a home. And when the château is unveiled at last, after months of anticipation, the whole town turns out to gaze in wonder – only to find their host lying dead in a pool of blood. Laurent suspects foul play, and when the gendarmes find nothing, he makes it his mission to unmask the murderer. But where to begin? From jilted lovers to jealous rivals, disgruntled employees to shadowy associates – not to mention more than a few angry musicians – practically everyone had a reason to want Carlos dead. As Laurent quickly learns, beneath its idyllic façade, the town of Saint-Chartier is rife with resentment and secret passions.

GET BOOK

This volume covers the major artistic and architectural masterpieces produced in Rome from antiquity up to the present day. It particularly considers art in ancient Rome, the Early Christian period, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance and Baroque periods, as well as more recent artistic productions. As such, it highlights the ongoing evolution of art in Rome. Its fifteen chapters are organized topographically with each corresponding to a specific area of Rome and exploring sites and monuments within that location. Whenever possible, the chapters are also arranged chronologically. Therefore, many of the ancient monuments are examined in the beginning chapters, and then subsequent section move chronologically through the Early Christian period, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, the Baroque, and modern periods. With its engaging and informative writing, the volume will enhance students’ knowledge of Rome, allowing them to get as much out of their study abroad experience as possible. In addition, Art in Rome will appeal to scholars and erudite travelers, who want to extensively explore the many artistic monuments of Rome.

GET BOOK

In this collection of essays, Antonia Gransden brings out the virtues of medieval writers and highlights their attitudes and habits of thought. She traces the continuing influence of Bede, the greatest of early medieval English historians, from his death to the 16th century. Bede's clarity and authority were welcomed by generations of monastic historians. At the other end is a humble 14th-century chronicle produced at Lynn with little to add other than a few local references.

GET BOOK

This is the first, and only, compendium to be written of the Lives of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles. Covering April through June, this second of four volumes provides an enlightening guide to another 160 of these inspiring and historic Orthodox men and women. These saints were not only key figures in the development of the Church; they are an intrinsic part of the fabric of the history of the British Isles, and by extension the entire Western world. As St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco reminded us, the West was Orthodox for a thousand years; he believed that in whatever land an Orthodox Christian found himself, it was his responsibility to venerate and pray to its national and local Saints. Orthodox Saints of the British Isles offers readers from all backgrounds insight into the importance of these righteous men and women. Filled with the Grace of God, from the most humble monks to the most devout martyrs and powerful kings, their faith influenced the development and spread of Christianity not just in the British Isles, but throughout the western world.

GET BOOK

Intricate, expressive, given to grandeur and even excess, Baroque art as a style is inseparable from the meanings it seeks to convey. Vernon Hyde Minor’s Baroque Visual Rhetoric probes this combination of style and message and – equally importantly – the methodological basis on which the critical art historian comes to establish that meaning. Drawing on a breathtaking range of critical literature, from the German founders of art history as an academic discipline to Heidegger, Derrida, and de Man, Minor considers the issue through a series of Baroque masterpieces: Bernini’s Baldacchino in St. Peter’s Basilica, the statues in the church of San Giovanni in Laterano, Borromini’s church of Sant’Ivo alla Sapienza, Baciccio’s frescoes in the church of Il Gesù, the paintings of Philippe de Champaigne, and the Corsini Chapel in San Giovanni in Laterano.

GET BOOK

Britain has a rich folklore, and the most fascinating figures in British folkore are undoubtedly fairies, who were first described in the Middle Ages, but were most fully analysed by 19th century Victorians, who were clearly intrigued by them.

GET BOOK

With more than ten thousand names of saints and biblical figures, this first-ever guide to Catholic baby names helps expectant parents find a beautiful and creative name for their child. Each entry includes the meaning of the name, language of origin, variations in form, a capsule biography, and relevant feast days and patron saint information. While it has become increasingly popular to name a baby after a town or a food, readers of The Catholic Baby Name Book will discover a bounty of names that are fun, creative, and Catholic. This new book in the CatholicMom.com Book series boasts thousands of names of saints from Christian tradition and the scriptures, including those newly canonized by popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI. Among the fun facts to be discovered: there are ten ways to spell Regina, the perennially popular name Jayden means “thankful” and “God has heard,” and Sophia—the most popular girl’s name in 2012—was a saint who had three daughters named Faith, Hope, and Charity (who were also saints!).

GET BOOK

Cultural heritage is a vital, multifaceted component of modern society. To better protect and promote the integrity of a culture, certain technologies have become essential tools. The Handbook of Research on Emerging Technologies for Architectural and Archaeological Heritage is an authoritative reference source for the latest scholarly research on the use of technological assistance for the preservation of architecture and archaeology in a global context. Focusing on various surveying technologies for the study, analysis, and protection of historical buildings, this book is ideally designed for professionals, researchers, upper-level students, and practitioners.

GET BOOK

The canonical collections took their starting point from the ‘sacred law’ (ius sacrum) characteristic of canon law, since its norms promote the sanctification of the individual persons. This principle was the basis for the compilation of the so-called Pre-Gratian canon law collections, too. In the recent research, there have arisen new stresses on the better understanding of how this textual development of canonical collections had happened prior the Decretum Gratiani. An original canonical textual witness testifies about the circumstances of its origin, and, indeed, about the physical effects on the text during daily usage. The endeavor to issue the complete canon law did not mean only the composition of the universal canonical norms, but also the gathering of the particular norms, inveterate customs, or theological statements that could set the contents of the ecclesiastical discipline in the proper light.

GET BOOK

Lord Saffron, one of the young bloods at Oxford University, is heir to a considerable fortune. But while making a documentary about the exotic lifestyles of the university's over-privileged set, Jemima Shore discovers that this handsome young man, with his lavish dances and sumptuous weekend parties, is not quite what he seems. And when a student is murdered and a series of attempts are made on Saffron's life, Jemima realises that she has started a terrible chain of events...

GET BOOK

This book examines the creative exchanges between architects, artists and intellectuals, from the Early Renaissance to the beginning of the Enlightenment, in the forging of relationships between architecture and emerging concepts of language in early modern Italy. The study extends across the spectrum of linguistic disputes during this time – among members of the clergy, humanists, philosophers and polymaths – on issues of grammar, rhetoric, philology, etymology and epigraphy, and how these disputes paralleled and informed important developments in architectural thinking and practice. Drawing upon a wealth of primary source material, such as humanist tracts, philosophical works, architectural/antiquarian treatises, epigraphic/philological studies, religious sermons and grammaticae, the book traces key periods when the emerging field of linguistics in early modern Italy impacted on the theory, design and symbolism of buildings.

GET BOOK

Uniquely authoritative and wide-ranging in its scope, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church is the indispensable reference work on all aspects of the Christian Church. It contains over 6,500 cross-referenced A-Z entries, and offers unrivalled coverage of all aspects of this vast and often complex subject, from theology; churches and denominations; patristic scholarship; and the bible; to the church calendar and its organization; popes; archbishops; other church leaders; saints; and mystics. In this new edition, great efforts have been made to increase and strengthen coverage of non-Anglican denominations (for example non-Western European Christianity), as well as broadening the focus on Christianity and the history of churches in areas beyond Western Europe. In particular, there have been extensive additions with regards to the Christian Church in Asia, Africa, Latin America, North America, and Australasia. Significant updates have also been included on topics such as liturgy, Canon Law, recent international developments, non-Anglican missionary activity, and the increasingly important area of moral and pastoral theology, among many others. Since its first appearance in 1957, the ODCC has established itself as an essential resource for ordinands, clergy, and members of religious orders, and an invaluable tool for academics, teachers, and students of church history and theology, as well as for the general reader.

GET BOOK

The First Asilomar Conference on Electron- and Photon-Molecule Collisions was held August 1-4, 1978 in Pacific Grove, California. This meeting brought together forty scientists who are actively involved in theoretical studies of electron scattering by, and photoionization of, small molecules. In this volume, are collected the contributions of the invited speakers, as well as the roundtable and evening discussions condensed from taped recordings of the entire proceedings. The subject matter reflects current activity in the field and describes many of the techniques that are being developed and applied to molecular collision problems. We would like to thank the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for providing the financial support that made this conference possible. Special thanks are due to Dr. Robert Junker of ONR and Dr. Ralph Kelley of AFOSR for the interest and encouragement they provided in all phases of this meeting. We also thank all the participants whose efforts and contributions made this conference a success. Finally, we thank Ms. Charlotte MacNaughton and Ms. Sara Jackson for the many hours they spent transcribing tapes and preparing this volume for publication.

GET BOOK

The Canadian science writer and novelist, Grant Allen was an early proponent of the theory of evolution. His first books dealt with scientific subjects, being influenced by associationist psychology as expounded by Alexander Bain and by Herbert Spencer. However, as his career developed he became a bestselling novelist of the Victorian era, penning intriguing sensation and science-fiction books. This comprehensive eBook presents Allen’s collected works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Allen’s life and works * Concise introductions to the novels and other texts * 19 novels, with individual contents tables * Features many rare novels appearing for the first time in digital publishing * Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts * Excellent formatting of the texts * Famous works are fully illustrated with their original artwork * Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the short stories * Easily locate the short stories you want to read * Includes Allen’s rare poetry collection ‘The Lower Slopes’ – available in no other collection * A wide selection of Allen’s non-fiction - spend hours exploring the author’s diverse areas of study * Features Edward Clodd’s seminal memoir - discover Allen’s literary life * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles CONTENTS: The Novels Philistia Babylon This Mortal Coil The White Man’s Foot The Jaws of Death What’s Bred in the Bone The Great Taboo Dumaresq’s Daughter The Duchess of Powysland Recalled to Life Blood Royal Michael’s Crag The Scallywag The Woman Who Did The British Barbarians A Splendid Sin Linnet Rosalba Hilda Wade The Shorter Fiction Strange Stories The Beckoning Hand, and Other Stories Ivan Greet’s Masterpiece and Other Stories Wednesday the Tenth An African Millionaire: Episodes in the Life of the Illustrious Colonel Clay Miss Cayley’s Adventures Twelve Tales The Short Stories List of Short Stories in Chronological Order List of Short Stories in Alphabetical Order The Poetry The Lower Slopes The Non-Fiction The Colour-Sense: Its Origin and Development Anglo-Saxon Britain Evolutionist at Large Flowers and Their Pedigrees Biographies of Working Men Charles Darwin Force and Energy Falling in Love Science in Arcady Post-Prandial Philosophy The Mediterranean Moorland Idylls Florence Paris Cities of Belgium County and Town in England Flashlights on Nature Side Lights The Autobiography My First Book The Biography Grant Allen: A Memoir by Edward Clodd Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles or to purchase this eBook as a Parts Edition of individual eBooks

GET BOOK

This study explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity in late medieval literature, documenting the trajectory of antimercantile ideology against major developments in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages.

GET BOOK

This vast reference resource will appeal to anyone who wishes to find depictions of New Testament narratives from scholars, to students, to picture researchers.

GET BOOK

A milestone in modern thought, Space, Time and Architecture has been reissued many times since its first publication in 1941 and translated into half a dozen languages. In this revised edition of Sigfried Giedion’s classic work, major sections have been added and there are 81 new illustrations. The chapters on leading contemporary architects have been greatly expanded. There is new material on the later development of Frank Lloyd Wright and the more recent buildings of Walter Gropius, particularly his American Embassy in Athens. In his discussion of Le Corbusier, Mr. Giedion provides detailed analyses of the Carpenter Center at Harvard University, Le Corbusier’s only building in the United States, and his Priory of La Tourette near Lyons. There is a section on his relations with his clients and an assessment of his influence on contemporary architecture, including a description of the Le Corbusier Center in Zurich (designed just before his death), which houses his works of art. The chapters on Mies van der Rohe and Alvar Aalto have been brought up to date with examples of their buildings in the sixties. There is an entirely new chapter on the Danish architect Jørn Utzon, whose work, as exemplified in his design for the Sydney Opera House, Mr. Giedion considers representative of post–World War II architectural concepts. A new essay, “Changing Notions of the City,” traces the evolution of the structure of the city throughout history and examines current attempts to deal with urban growth, as shown in the work of such architects as José Luis Sert, Kenzo Tange, and Fumihiko Maki. Mr. Sert’s Peabody Terrace is discussed as an example of the interlocking of the collective and individual spheres. Finally, the conclusion has been enlarged to include a survey of the limits of the organic in architecture.

GET BOOK

The men and women who gathered at the Tabard Inn in Southwark in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales are only the most famous of the tens of thousands of English pilgrims, from kings to peasants, who set off to the shrines of saints and the sites of miracles in the middle ages. As they traveled along well-established routes in the hope of a cure or a blessing, to fulfill a vow or to see new places, the pilgrims left records that let us see medieval people and their concerns and beliefs from a unique and intimate angle. As well as the most famous shrines, notably that of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury, Diana Webb also describes the many local pilgrimages and cults, and their rise and fall, over the English middle ages as a whole "Webb's scholarly achievement deserves high praise" -Christina Hardyment, The Independent

GET BOOK

What impact did the Church have on society? How did social change affect religious practice? Within the context of these wide-ranging questions, this study offers a fresh interpretation of the relationship between Church, society and religion in England across five centuries of change. Andrew Brown examines how the teachings of an increasingly 'universal' Church decisively affected the religious life of the laity in medieval England. However, by exploring a broad range of religious phenomena, both orthodox and heretical (including corporate religion and the devotional practices surrounding cults and saints) Brown shows how far lay people continued to shape the Church at a local level. In the hands of the laity, religious practices proved malleable. Their expression was affected by social context, status and gender, and even influenced by those in authority. Yet, as Brown argues, religion did not function simply as an expression of social power - hierarchy, patriarchy and authority could be both served and undermined by religion. In an age in which social mobility and upheaval, particularly in the wake of the Black Death, had profound effects on religious attitudes and practices, Brown demonstrates that our understanding of late medieval religion should be firmly placed within this context of social change.

GET BOOK

From the award-winning author of The End of Vandalism. “Equal parts heist caper, ghost story and romance . . . in prose that is spare and sly.” (The New York Times) Set in the rugged region of the Midwest that gives the novel its title, The Driftless Area is the story of Pierre Hunter, a young bartender with unfailing optimism, a fondness for coin tricks, and an uncanny capacity for finding trouble. When he falls in love, with the mysterious and isolated Stella Rosmarin, Pierre becomes the central player in a revenge drama he must unravel and bring to its shocking conclusion. Along the way he will liberate $77,000 from a murderous thief, summon the resources that have eluded him all his life, and come to question the very meaning of chance and mortality. For nothing is as it seems in The Driftless Area. Identities shift, violent secrets lie in wait, the future can cause the past, and love becomes a mission that can take you beyond this world. In its tender, cool irony, The Driftless Area recalls the best of neonoir, and its cast of bona fide small-town eccentrics adrift in the American Midwest make for a clever and deeply pleasurable read from one of our most beloved authors. “Drury is nothing less than a wizard . . . Not since Twin Peaks has he rural surreal had such an artful airing.” —The Boston Globe “Superb . . . by one of America’s finest, most imaginative authors.” —San Francisco Chronicle “With deceptively simple prose, Drury is able to evoke characters and scenes in just a few brush strokes.” —Los Angeles Times

GET BOOK

One of the principal resources for study of Italian Renaissance art and artists, Vasari's Lives offers colorful, detailed portraits of the era's most representative figures. This single-volume edition spotlights eight prominent artists.

GET BOOK

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

GET BOOK

Now fully revised and updated The Book of Saints is a comprehensive biographical dictionary of saints canonised by the Roman Catholic Church. It contains the names of over 10,000 saints, including all modern ones, with significant information about their lives and achievements. Each section begins with an illustration of a particular saint, and the volume includes a list of national martyrs, a bibliography, and a helpful glossary. Produced by the Benedictine monks of St. Augustine's Abbey, Chilworth (formerly Ramsgate) this classic resource is now in its 8th edition, and is fully revised to include all the saints canonised in the last ten years, including Pope St John Paul II and Blessed Paul VI.

GET BOOK

A collection of 15 guided walking tours of the ancient Latin descriptions found throughout Rome. Rome’s oldest known Latin inscription dates from the sixth century BC; the most recent major specimen was mounted in 2006—a span of more than two and a half millennia. Remarkably, many of these inscriptions are still to be found in situ, on the walls, gates, temples, obelisks, bridges, fountains, and churches of the city. Classicist Tyler Lansford has collected some 400 of these inscriptions and arranged them—with English translations—into fifteen walking tours that trace the physical and historical contours of the city. Each itinerary is prefaced by an in-depth introduction that provides a survey of the history and topography of the relevant area of the city. The Latin texts appear on the left-hand page with English translations on the right. The original texts are equipped with full linguistic annotation, and the translations are supplemented with historical and cultural notes that explain who mounted them and why. This unique guide will prove a fascinating and illuminating companion for both sophisticated visitors to the Eternal City and armchair travelers seeking a novel perspective into Rome's rich history. “This book is wonderful. . . . Lansford’s evocative depictions of monuments, cityscape, and memorable humans have inspired me anew with the fascination of Rome.” —Mary T. Boatwright, Duke University “If this book is not slipped into many a Rome-bound suitcase, there is no justice in the world. I can think of few more enjoyable companions on a prowl through the city.” —Jane Stevenson, Times Literary Supplement (UK)

GET BOOK

Miracles are extraordinary facts or events that happen through divine intervention. They strike instantaneous fear, awe, and admiration. They are not meant for entertainment as the mad King Herod wanted them from Jesus. Neither were they for the amusement of Satan who tried to tempt Jesus to turn stone into bread. The extraordinary, awesome character of miracles is meant by God to attract man's curiosity to hear what He wants him or her to know or need to know for his salvation. That's divine psychology -- very much like what scholastics used to teach: learning starts with the senses. Remember how Moses' curiosity was excited by the burning bush that preceded God's message: go seek Pharaoh to let God's chosen People go? Indeed, once man's attention is engaged, God reveals His message -- a salvation-related message. Miracles are God's ways of communicating what He wants people to know and live by to attain the purpose of their existence. Citing extraordinary events in the Old Testament and the prodigious works of Christ, the Apostles, and the Saints, "Handbook of Miracles" defines miracles as conveyors of God's messages of salvation. Every true miracle is salvation-ordained. Miracles were among Christ's manners by which He revealed a way of life that leads people to eternal happiness. By the miracle of His resurrection, for instance, Christ reveals He is the Son of God sent by the Father to redeem mankind from sin. The book further explains the nature of miracles from philosophy and theology. From eternity, we read, the Creator determined what everything in His creation can or cannot do. God's creation includes angels, who are pure spirits, and humans, who are made of spirit and matter. He created the universe and everything in it: physical objects, time and movement, any conceivable and inconceivable energy and potency embedded in them. The sum total of His creation and everything in it is what we come to know as nature. Nature is finite; it has limits. Only God is infinite; He is limitless. He can do what He wills to do-- can make any creature do what is beyond what He determined it can or cannot do. And when that happens, miracle occurs. The author also explains scripturally and theologically how Mary's conception of Jesus and His birth are miracles; so are Mary's immaculate conception and assumption to heaven. The conversions of St. Peter and St. Paul are also discussed as internal miracles, as explained by St. Thomas Aquinas. "Handbook of Miracles" notes that since people live in space and time that continually change, God makes miracles to happen in different times and various places; thus, miracles happen in every generation and in various places of the world. The messages conveyed by the Saints' miracles -- together with their holy lives -- model and explain for their generation and generations after them the way of life taught by Christ. This book attempts to spell out the meaning of each of the Saints' miracles, but also invites readers to meditate on the miracles' significance as applicable to every reader's personal life. The "Handbook" discusses the various miracles wrought by God through the Saints who, because of their holy lives, their unwavering faith and heroic love of God and neighbor, became conduits of God's power and mercy. Accordingly, one or the other Saint raised the dead back to life, cured the sick, multiplied food, read minds and prophesied, received the gift of tongues, defied the enemies of God and laws of nature, levitated and shone like the sun. And each of these miracles conveyed a divine message of salvation. Citing the Scriptures, the author cites conditions by which miracles can happen to anybody: unwavering faith, coupled with love, according to St. Paul "If I have faith so as to remove mountains, yet do not have love, I am nothing" (1 Cor 13, 2-3). Perseverance (Lk 18, 37-41). Resignation to God's will by which we ask God's will be done (Lk

GET BOOK

Dan Brown's best-selling novel and subsequent popular movie, The DaVinci Code, created a sensation and intense criticism from the Roman Catholic clergy; yet it was fiction! Now, with Imma Penn's Dogma Evolution and Papal Fallicies, little known historical facts have been presented using the actual statements of priests, bishops, emperors, kings, popes and contemporary chroniclers. It shines a bright light on the evolution of Christian religious beliefs and practices that inspired Dan Brown's creation. A darker side of Catholicism is revealed - its schism controversies, the antipopes, papal corruptions and obscenities, the selling of indulgences, simony, the Inquisition condoned and encouraged by 73 popes, and the torture and the burning at the stake of hundreds of thousands of non-believers. Penn's critical history of the Roman Catholic Church shows the Curia presiding over an institution still in tune with the 13th century. Modern-day "cafeteria" Catholics may be surprised by some of the facts which have been kept out of the public eye. They may also be fascinated to learn how Catholic religious doctrine and rituals have evolved from pagan practices. Catholicism is ripe for reform. The recent priestly misbehaviors and the cover-up are well known and repetitive of the Church's reactions to the misdeeds of its past. A fresh, transparent approach is needed to cleanse the institution of it excessive non-spiritual baggage. It is no wonder that some prominent Catholics, like authors Garry Wills and James Carroll, have called for a Vatican III, a coming together of the Church, to bring about the necessary public apologies and reforms. Readers may be interested to learn of the revelations in this book.

GET BOOK

Marian Engel emerged as a writer during that period in Canada when nationalism increased and “new feminism” dawned. Although she is recognized as a distinguished woman of letters, she has not been widely studied; consequently we know relatively little about her and her craft. The material collected in Marian Engel’s Notebooks: “Ah, mon cahier, écoute...” is a major step in redressing that neglect. Extracts carefully chosen by Christl Verduyn from Marian Engel’s forty-nine notebooks — notebooks Engel began in the late 1940s and which she maintained until her death in 1985 — track Engel’s creative development, illustrate her commitment to the craft of writing and document her growth as a major Canadian writer. The notebooks also portray Engel’s surprising leaps of logic, her fascination with the bizarre, the eclecticism of her reading and the depth and variety of her thinking. Finally, they present moving documentation of a woman facing cancer and early death. Christl Verduyn’s illuminating introductory discussions to each of the notebooks unobtrusively guide us in the reading of these sometimes difficult writings. Marian Engel’s Notebooks: “Ah, mon cahier, écoute...” leaves readers with a vivid sense of Canadian culture during the 1960s and 1970s. It provides insight into the literary life of one of Canada’s significant woman writers, including her connections with other Canadian writers, and will be of special interest to scholars working in the field of literature.

GET BOOK

A bourde is an English comedic poem similar to a French fabliau but with a moralizing element and less of an emphasis on violence. In this fresh edition of ten Middle English bourdes, Melissa M. Furrow "aims to put funny (or would-be funny) Middle English poems under the eyes of a much broader readership" than the scholarly researchers she appealed to in her earlier edition of many of the same poems. This collection is specifically designed for students, and has contextualizing introductions, copious notes, glosses, and a glossary.

GET BOOK