The Book of V.

Read or download online The Book of V. ebook full in format Pdf, ePub, Kindle, and many more. The Book of V. written by Anna Solomon, published by Henry Holt and Company on 2020-05-05 with 320 pages for you to read. The Book of V. is one from many Fiction books that available for free in the amazon kindle unlimited, click Get Book to start reading and download books online free now. With Kindle Unlimited Free trial, you can read as many books as you want today.

The Book of V.

The Book of V.

  • Author : Anna Solomon
  • ISBN :
  • Category : Fiction
  • Publisher : Henry Holt and Company
  • Pages : 320
  • Release Date : 2020-05-05

A GOOD MORNING AMERICA BOOK CLUB PICK A BELLETRIST BOOK CLUB PICK For fans of The Hours and Fates and Furies, a bold, kaleidoscopic novel intertwining the lives of three women across three centuries as their stories of sex, power, and desire finally converge in the present day. Lily is a mother and a daughter. And a second wife. And a writer, maybe? Or she was going to be, before she had children. Now, in her rented Brooklyn apartment she’s grappling with her sexual and intellectual desires, while also trying to manage her roles as a mother and a wife in 2016. Vivian Barr seems to be the perfect political wife, dedicated to helping her charismatic and ambitious husband find success in Watergate-era Washington D.C. But one night he demands a humiliating favor, and her refusal to obey changes the course of her life—along with the lives of others. Esther is a fiercely independent young woman in ancient Persia, where she and her uncle’s tribe live a tenuous existence outside the palace walls. When an innocent mistake results in devastating consequences for her people, she is offered up as a sacrifice to please the King, in the hopes that she will save them all. In Anna Solomon's The Book of V., these three characters' riveting stories overlap and ultimately collide, illuminating how women’s lives have and have not changed over thousands of years.

Widely praised as a seminal contribution to the study of the Old Testament when it first appeared, Michael V. Fox's Character and Ideology in the Book of Esther is now available in a second edition, complete with an up-to-date critical review of recent Esther scholarship. Fox's commentary, based on his own translation of the Hebrew text, captures the meaning and artistry of Esther's inspiring story. After laying out the background information essential for properly reading Esther, Fox offers commentary on the text that clearly unpacks its message and relevance. Fox also looks in depth at each character in the story of Esther, showing how they were carefully shaped by the book's author to teach readers a new view of how to live as Jews in foreign lands.

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From the award-winning author of The Book of V., an unflinching, lushly imagined love story set against the backdrop of the epic frontier When 16-year-old Minna Losk journeys from Odessa to America as a mail-order bride, she dreams of a young, wealthy husband, a handsome townhouse, and freedom from physical labor and pogroms. But her husband Max turns out to be twice her age, rigidly Orthodox, and living in a one-room sod hut in South Dakota with his two teenage sons. The country is desolate, the work treacherous. And most troubling, Minna finds herself increasingly attracted to her older stepson. As a brutal winter closes in, the family's limits are tested, and Minna, drawing on strengths she barely knows she has, is forced to confront her despair, as well as her desire. A Boston Globe Best Seller “Evocative of Alice Munro, Amy Bloom, and Willa Cather, but fueled by Anna Solomon’s singular imagination . . . a masterful debut . . . embroidered with sage, beautiful writing on every page . . . marks the start of a long, fine, and important career.” —Jenna Blum, author of Those Who Save Us “Minna is a terrifically complex heroine: a little snobby, a little selfish and wholly sympathetic.” —The New York Times “Like...Jonathan Safran Foer and Dara Horn. [A] wondrously strange story of Jewish immigration.” —Miami Herald “This mythic rendition of the American immigrant narrative...finds the wondrous in the ordinary and vividly depicts the complex collisions between the Old World and the New.” —More

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“An extraordinary novel . . . a triumph of insight and storytelling.” —Associated Press “A true masterpiece.” —Glennon Doyle, author of Untamed An extraordinary story set in the first century about a woman who finds her voice and her destiny, from the celebrated number one New York Times bestselling author of The Secret Life of Bees and The Invention of Wings In her mesmerizing fourth work of fiction, Sue Monk Kidd takes an audacious approach to history and brings her acclaimed narrative gifts to imagine the story of a young woman named Ana. Raised in a wealthy family with ties to the ruler of Galilee, she is rebellious and ambitious, with a brilliant mind and a daring spirit. She engages in furtive scholarly pursuits and writes narratives about neglected and silenced women. Ana is expected to marry an older widower, a prospect that horrifies her. An encounter with eighteen-year-old Jesus changes everything. Their marriage evolves with love and conflict, humor and pathos in Nazareth, where Ana makes a home with Jesus, his brothers, and their mother, Mary. Ana's pent-up longings intensify amid the turbulent resistance to Rome's occupation of Israel, partially led by her brother, Judas. She is sustained by her fearless aunt Yaltha, who harbors a compelling secret. When Ana commits a brazen act that puts her in peril, she flees to Alexandria, where startling revelations and greater dangers unfold, and she finds refuge in unexpected surroundings. Ana determines her fate during a stunning convergence of events considered among the most impactful in human history. Grounded in meticulous research and written with a reverential approach to Jesus's life that focuses on his humanity, The Book of Longings is an inspiring, unforgettable account of one woman's bold struggle to realize the passion and potential inside her, while living in a time, place and culture devised to silence her. It is a triumph of storytelling both timely and timeless, from a masterful writer at the height of her powers.

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This is the forth book in this series that began with an in-depth look at how God views details, communicates with this world, and decides what process to use. Of course this series of books looked at aspects recorded in scripture about the Tabernacle. How the materials were collected, specific design details, who did the work, and how the Tabernacle was constructed. Much of that information is found in dozens, maybe hundreds of other books about the Tabernacle. But there are details setting this book apart from every other book written about the Tabernacle. This book takes a verse by verse, story by story, chapter by chapter look at the Tabernacle. In other words, this book presents a picture of the Tabernacle from God's point of view. Which the beginning of this series pointed out, is much different than any human perspective.

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Not a cloud in the blue Atlanta sky, Jeffrey Ross made his morning visit to the Dunwoody Starbucks, expecting this day to be like any other. It wouldn’t. Samarra Russell left her meeting at Emory Medical Center after receiving the strange call and wondered if it had anything to do with her immunology research at CDC. It was a secret, or was supposed to be. Going home as instructed, Samarra opened the box of Valentine candy on the kitchen counter and collapsed. Before losing her balance, Samarra recognized the small finger, severed and still wearing the tiny ring she gave him for his 7th birthday. Her precious son. She opened the note after regaining limited senses and read. If she didn’t want to receive young Thomas Russell’s head in a box, she would do as instructed. And she did.

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Upton Sinclair’s The Book of Life is a contains well founded advice and consists of two parts. The first part, Book of the Mind, covers spiritual topics such as faith, morality, and the subconscious. With intense conversations on the definition of each as well as their relationship and codependence on each other, Sinclair answers tough life questions and provides many thought-provoking ideas. While the first part of Sinclair’s work concerns the intangibles in life, focusing on matters of the mind, the second part of The Book of Life elects to address physical topics. Book of the Body shares Sinclair’s thoughts and research on diets, featuring discussions on how people should consume food, including fasting, and poisonous products. In this section he talks about diseases as well, citing their causes and offering advice on how to avoid them. Book of the Body also contains Sinclair’s advice on love, marriage, and sex. With these topics, Sinclair focuses on both the mental and physical attributes of life, advising how to lead the most fulfilling life possible. Though some of his ideas and advice are dated, The Book of Life remains relevant and interesting to a modern audience. First, though philosophy has progressed since Sinclair’s time, some human truths have remained evident and ever-present. Furthermore, this historical novel reveals the culture and world Sinclair was writing in, as well as allowing readers an intimate side of the esteemed author’s personality. The Book of Life serves as an encouraging work for thought, action, and gives great insights for how Upton Sinclair lived and what he believed. This edition of The Book of Life by Upton Sinclair is now presented in a modern, readable font and features a striking new cover design. With these accommodations, contemporary readers are allowed unparalleled access to Sinclair’s insight on love, sex, health, faith, and morality.

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A Redactional Study of the Book of Isaiah 13-23 argues that a series of programmatic additions were made to the oracles concerning the nations in Isaiah 13-23 during the late-exilic period by the same circle of writers who were responsible for Isaiah 40-55. These additions were made to create continuity between the ancient oracles against the nations from the Isaiah tradition and the future fate of the same nations as the late-exilic redactor(s) foresaw. The additions portray a two-sided vision concerning the nations. One group of passages depicts a positive turn for certain nations while the other group of passages continues to pronounce doom against the remaining nations. This double-sided vision is set out first in Isaiah 14 surrounding the famous taunt against the fallen tyrant. 14:1-2, before the taunt, paints the broad picture of the future return of the exiles and the attachment of the gentiles to the people of Israel. After the taunt and other sayings of YHWH against his enemies, 14:26-27 extends the sphere of the underlying theme of 14:4b-25a, namely YHWH's judgement against boastful and tyrannical power(s), to all nations and the whole earth. The two sides of this vision are then applied accordingly to the rest of the oracles concerning nations in chapters 13-23. To the nations that have experienced similar disasters as the people of Israel, words of hope in line with 14:1-2 were given. To the nations that still possessed some prominence and reasons to be proud, words of doom in line with 14:26-27 were decreed.

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This book is the product of fifty years of scholarship. It consists of two main parts: the first is an essay on the history of interpreting the book of Job in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The second part is a commentary on the book.

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This book is dedicated to Aristid Lindenmayer on the occasion of his 60th birthday on November 17, 1985. Contributions range from mathematics and theoretical computer science to biology. Aristid Lindenmayer introduced language-theoretic models for developmental biology in 1968. Since then the models have been cus tomarily referred to as L systems. Lindenmayer's invention turned out to be one of the most beautiful examples of interdisciplinary science: work in one area (developmental biology) induces most fruitful ideas in other areas (theory of formal languages and automata, and formal power series). As evident from the articles and references in this book, the in terest in L systems is continuously growing. For newcomers the first contact with L systems usually happens via the most basic class of L systems, namely, DOL systems. Here "0" stands for zero context between developing cells. It has been a major typographical problem that printers are unable to distinguish between 0 (zero) and 0 (oh). Thus, DOL was almost always printed with "oh" rather than "zero", and also pronounced that way. However, this misunderstanding turned out to be very fortunate. The wrong spelling "DOL" of "DOL" could be read in the suggestive way: DO L Indeed, hundreds of researchers have followed this suggestion. Some of them appear as contributors to this book. Of the many who could not contribute, we in particular regret the absence of A. Ehrenfeucht, G. Herman and H.A. Maurer whose influence in the theory of L systems has been most significant.

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This volume offers a synchronic, literary reading of the final form of the laws of Exodus 20.22-23.19 (commonly, though inaccurately labelled "The Book of the Covenant"), in contrast with primarily source- and form-critical approaches commonly utilized in the past. The work seeks to demonstrate that this literary unit is much more coherent, more integrated into its narrative context, less in need of the positing of corruptions, secondary insertions, rearrangements or the like than has usually been recognized. The approach instead seeks to find authorial purpose in each case where scholars have often posited scribal misadventure, "seams" between sources, disorder, contradiction, or corruption.

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The four essays in this volume present an overview of current issues in studies of the book of Job. The opening essay, by Williams, deals with major aspects of Joban research: new commentaries, Near Eastern backgrounds, textual criticism, language and vocabulary, literary criticism, dating problems, and theological ideas. The remaining essays focus on specifics from within Williams’ overview. Craigie discusses the impact of Ugaritic language and literature on studies of Job. Cox is concerned with textual criticism of Job, primarily with regard to the Septuagint. And, in the final essay, Aufrecht illustrates the importance of Aramaic in biblical studies in general and studies of Job in particular.

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Although many scholars recognize literary similarities between Hosea, Amos, Micah, and Zephaniah, defining the compositional relationship between these texts remains a matter of debate. Following the scholarly trajectory of exploring the compositional relationship between the Twelve prophets, several scholars argue that these four prophetic texts formed a precursory collection to the Book of the Twelve. Yet even among advocates for this ‘Book of the Four’ there remain differences in defining the form and function of the collection. By reexamining the literary parallels between these texts, Werse shows how different methodological convictions have led to the diverse composition models in the field today. Through careful consideration of emerging insights in the study of deuteronomism and scribalism, Werse provides an innovative composition model explaining how these four texts came to function as a collection in the wake of the traumatic destruction of Jerusalem. This volume explores a historic function of these prophetic voices by examining the editorial process that drew them together.

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This is the second edition of a 1979 commentary on the book of Daniel. The commentary is completely revised, and the introduction in particular is here much extended and addresses fundamental questions regarding the book of Daniel and the apocalyptic movement it inaugurates (with 1 Enoch). Daniel is an indispensable trove and reference about issues like the apocalyptic vision of world’s periodized history, the notion of Son of Man, messianism without a messiah, the belief in resurrection, the kingdom of God, the centrifugal spread of divine revelation, and the positive role of the Jewish diaspora. This edition is meant for scholars, college and university researchers, and students of the Bible (of the Old Testament and New Testament) in general.

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This volume explores the themes of theodicy and hope in both individual portions of the Twelve (books and sub-sections) and in the Book of the Twelve as a whole, as the contributors use a diversity of approaches to the text(s) with a particular interest in synchronic perspectives. While these essays regularly engage the mostly redactional scholarship surrounding the Book of Twelve, there is also an examination of various forms of literary analysis of final text forms, and engagement in descriptions of the thematic and theological perspectives of the individual books and of the collection as a whole. The synchronic work in these essays is thus in regular conversation with diachronic research, and as a general rule they take various conclusions of redactional research as a point of departure. The specific themes, theodicy and hope, are key ideas that have provided the opportunity for contributors to explore individual books or sub-sections within the Twelve, and the overarching development (in both historical and literary terms) and deployment of these themes in the collection.

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This monograph is an exposition of the theory of central simple algebras with involution, in relation to linear algebraic groups. It provides the algebra-theoretic foundations for much of the recent work on linear algebraic groups over arbitrary fields. Involutions are viewed as twisted forms of (hermitian) quadrics, leading to new developments on the model of the algebraic theory of quadratic forms. In addition to classical groups, phenomena related to triality are also discussed, as well as groups of type $F_4$ or $G_2$ arising from exceptional Jordan or composition algebras. Several results and notions appear here for the first time, notably the discriminant algebra of an algebra with unitary involution and the algebra-theoretic counterpart to linear groups of type $D_4$. This volume also contains a Bibliography and Index. Features: original material not in print elsewhere a comprehensive discussion of algebra-theoretic and group-theoretic aspects extensive notes that give historical perspective and a survey on the literature rational methods that allow possible generalization to more general base rings

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The series Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (BZAW) covers all areas of research into the Old Testament, focusing on the Hebrew Bible, its early and later forms in Ancient Judaism, as well as its branching into many neighboring cultures of the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman world.

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This work by Nancy deClaisse-Walford, Rolf Jacobson, and Beth Tanner is the most complete and detailed one-volume commentary available on the Psalms. Significantly, the volume reflects the combined insights of three superior (younger) biblical scholars. DeClaisse-Walford, Jacobson, and Tanner offer a succinct introduction to the Psalter, a new translation of all the psalms that takes special account of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and individual entries on each psalm unit. Throughout the book they draw on state-of-the-art research on the canonical shape and shaping of the Psalter and evidence a nuanced attention to the poetic nature of the psalms.

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The Books of Esther applies form-critical tools to the Septuagint and non-Septuagint ('Lucianic') Greek texts of Esther. Differences in vocabulary, content and style show that the Greek books of Esther are independent traditions stemming from, and aimed at, two distinct religious communities. The 'Lucianic' version appears more personal, orthodox, nationalistic and Jewish; its audience is Palestinian and it intends to foster communal identity. The Septuagint version breathes a more matter-of-fact, reportorial, Hellenistic style, with an eye to tolerance of heretics and audience entertainment. The Masoretic version became canonized because it is the most multivalent of the Esthers, appealing to both religious and secular elements of Judaism.

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Power comprises one of the key topics of the book of Samuel. This theme encompasses tribal contentions, power differentials between religious authorities and kings, fathers and sons, men and women. The articles assembled here explore Israel's search for political identity and Samuel's critique of monarchy, the book's constructions of power and powerlessness, and the editors' and early audiences' postmonarchic reflections. Historical and social-scientific approaches to the book of Samuel find ancient Near Eastern parallels for the political organization of Israel and describe the social conditions under authoritarian regimes. Redactional approaches examine the diachronic development of Samuel's varying perceptions of monarchy, from that institution's inception through its entrenchment in Israelite and Judahite society, until it underwent a sudden, cataclysmic failure. And literary and theological approaches advocate for contemporary reconsideration and application of the book's more noble principles.

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The theory of traces employs techniques and tackles problems from quite diverse areas which include formal language theory, combinatorics, graph theory, algebra, logic, and the theory of concurrent systems. In all these areas the theory of traces has led to interesting problems and significant results. It has made an especially big impact in formal language theory and the theory of concurrent systems. In both these disciplines it is a well-recognized and dynamic research area. Within formal language theory it yields the theory of partially commutative monoids, and provides an important connection between languages and graphs. Within the theory of concurrent systems it provides an important formal framework for the analysis and synthesis of concurrent systems. This monograph covers all important research lines of the theory of traces; each chapter is devoted to one research line and is written by leading experts. The book is organized in such a way that each chapter can be read independently — and hence it is very suitable for advanced courses or seminars on formal language theory, the theory of concurrent systems, the theory of semigroups, and combinatorics. An extensive bibliography is included. At present, there is no other book of this type on trace theory. Contents:Basic Notions:Introduction to Trace Theory (A Mazurkiewicz)Dependence Graphs (H J Hoogeboom & G Rozenberg)Algebra and Combinatorics:Combinatorics in Trace Monoids I (C Choffrut)Combinatorics in Trace Monoids II (G Duchamp & D Krob)Counting Techniques for Inclusion, Equivalence and Membership Problems (A Bertoni et al.)Languages and Automata:Recognizable Trace Languages (E Ochma(ski)Asynchronous Automata (W Zielonka)Construction of Asynchronous Automata (V Diekert & A Mischoll)Concurrency and Logic:Trace Structures and Other Models for Concurrency (M Nielsen & G Winskel)Traces and Logic (W Penczek & R Kuiper)Generalizations:Infinite Traces (P Gastin & A Petit)Semi-Commutations (M Clerbout et al.) Readership: Computer scientists and mathematicians. keywords:Traces;Concurrency;Partial Commutation;Automata;Formal Languages;Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science;Infinite Behaviour

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Linville argues that a new approach to the book of Kings is needed because of the failings of the usual historical-critical methods. He adopts a holistic approach which sees the book as a Persian-era text intended to articulate politically and religiously significant symbols within the book's monarchic history. These express the producer's reactions to important issues of Jewish identity in the continuing Diaspora and in Jerusalem. In the story of the schisms and apostacies of Israel's defunct monarchies both the Diaspora and cultural pluralism are legitimized. Rival versions of Israelite heritage are reconciled under an overarching sense of a greater Israelite history and identity.

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Gender in the Book of Ben Sira is a semantic analysis and, also, an investigation of hermeneutical pathways for performing such an analysis. A comparison of possible Greek and Hebrew gender taxonomies precedes the extensive delineation of the target-category, gender. The delineation includes invisible influences in the Book of Ben Sira such as the author’s choices of genre and his situation as a member of a colonized group within a Hellenistic empire. When the Book of Ben Sira’s genre-constrained invectives against women and male fools are excluded, the remaining expectations for women and for men are mostly equivalent, in terms of a pious life lived according to Torah. However, Ben Sira says nothing about distinctions at the level of how “living according to Torah” would differ for the two groups. His book presents an Edenic ideal of marriage through allusions to Genesis 1 to 4, and a substantial overlap of erotic discourse for the female figures of Wisdom and the “intelligent wife” creates tropes similar to those of the Song of Songs. In addition, Ben Sira’s colonial status affects what he says and how he says it; by writing in Hebrew, he could craft the Greek genres of encomium and invective to carry multiple levels of meaning that subvert Hellenistic/Greek claims to cultural superiority.

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Prophetic sayings are generally a reaction to immediate realities, and therefore attempts to understand prophetic literature without the benefit of the prophet's historical milieu are limited or inaccurate. Contrary to the prevailing opinion that Joel is post-exilic, the book is located within the exilic period, recognising the lack of any rebuke consistent with a people experiencing deep despair. The Book of Joel places great emphasis on the motif of the divine presence residing in the midst of Israel, and it is asserted that the prophet's main purpose was to bring the people to renew their connection with the Lord after the destruction of the Temple, which, though physically ruined, had not lost its religious significance. A literary and rhetorical analysis demonstrates how the prophet sought to influence his audience. Literary devices and rhetorical tools are investigated, and their relevance and contribution to the book's meanings are explored. One central feature of the book is its focus on a detailed discussion of the position and purpose of the locust plague, employing recent literary approaches.

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Despite the attention that has already been paid to the theme of creation in the book of Sirach, scholarship has yet to provide a comprehensive analysis of Ben Sira's instruction regarding the cosmic order and its role in the divine bestowal of wisdom upon human beings. This book, which consists of two parts, fills a lacuna in scholarship by offering such an analysis. The first part of this study examines Ben Sira's three main treatments of the created world, thus providing a comprehensive description and synthesis of Ben Sira's doctrine concerning the created order of the cosmos. The second part of this work analyzes the place of human beings in general, and the Jewish people in particular, within the cosmic order. This second part includes an analysis of the role of the created order in Ben Sira's wisdom instruction in 1:1-10 and 24:1-34 as well as an elucidation of the way in which his treatments of various kinds of people—civic leaders, wives, doctors, manual laborers, scribes, and cultic personnel—are integral to Ben Sira's doctrine of creation. This study demonstrates that the created order is a fundamental category that Ben Sira relies upon in articulating his instructions about wisdom and wise behavior.

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This book examines the coherence of the book of Micah by means of analysis of the text's literary structure and conceptuality. A two-part structure is proposed, divided between chs. 1-5 and 6-7, each part characterized by a dispute over the fate of Israel. The interrelationship of the parts, including prophecies of judgment and announcements of promise suggests that the basis of the book's coherence is that Yahweh's justice in judgment and mercy, preserving and forgiving the remnant, are the significant factors in determining Israel's fate.

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Over twenty-five years in the making, this much-anticipated commentary promises to be the standard study of Proverbs for years to come. Written by eminent Old Testament scholar Bruce Waltke, this two-volume commentary is unquestionably the most comprehensive work on Proverbs available. Grounded in the new literary criticism that has so strengthened biblical interpretation of late, Waltke's commentary on Proverbs demonstrates the profound, ongoing relevance of this Old Testament book for Christian faith and life. A thorough introduction addresses such issues as text and versions, structure, authorship, and theology. The detailed commentary itself explains and elucidates Proverbs as "theological literature." Waltke's highly readable style -- evident even in his original translation of the Hebrew text -- makes his scholarly work accessible to teachers, pastors, Bible students, and general readers alike.

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Thompson's study on the Book of Jeremiah is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.

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This Oxford dissertation offers a detailed analysis of the text of the Old Testament book of the prophet Amos and attempts to reconstruct the process of its composition. It looks into the probable historical circumstances in which the prophetic oracles were collected and edited and seeks to show how the prophetic message lived on and spoke to the various communities which preserved and transmitted it.

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Craigie's study on the Book of Deuteronomy is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.

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This title was first published in 2003. The book bearing the title of 'Zechariah' is, in its present form, an amalgam of oracles and prophecies stemming from Zechariah himself as well as others. It became part of Jewish scripture, was revered and valued, and was a partiuclar favourite of a number of early Christian writers. Often cited by New Testament writers, this book of one of the most important of the 'minor prophets' is itself deeply indebted to earlier Jewish prophetic texts and has been an important resource for later writers, Jewish and Christian, as they sought to tap their own 'Biblical' material. The amalgam of oracles and prophecies presented in the book of Zechariah offers an ideal thematic focus for the leading scholars in this volume who explore areas of the Hebrew Bible, post-Biblical Jewish literature, and early Christian literature and history (in the New Testament and beyond). The essays examine the book of Zechariah itself as well as its subsequent interpretation by a number of other writers, Jewish and Christian. The essays raise important issues in relation to the influence of biblical texts in subsequent literature and also the broad area of 'intertextuality'' and the way in which later texts relate to and use earlier texts in their sacred tradition.

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Is the author of Ecclesisastes a determinist? Many readers, from the Targumist and Ibn Ezra up to the present day, have thought so. But there has been no systematic investigation of Qoheleth's determinism, its nature and extent, its relationship to free will and its philosophical background. In separate chapters, Rudman discusses key terms and texts that express a deterministic worldview, then explores the sources for Qoheleth's thought. He concludes that the author was a sage writing in the third quarter of the third century BCE, who was profoundly influenced by Stoic ideas.

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The formation of the Book of the Twelve is one of the most vigorously debated subjects in Old Testament studies today. This volume assembles twenty-four essays by the world’s leading experts, providing an overview of the present state of scholarship in the field. The book’s contributors focus on questions of method, history, as well as redactional and textual history.

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This work is concerned with the influence of biblical and prophetic traditions on the author of the book of Revelation, and in particular his use of the prophecies of Isaiah. First, John's own prophetic consciousness and expression is compared with previous Israelite-Jewish and early Christian prophetic conventions. This is followed by an evaluation of John's use of the OT in general, including a discussion of methodology for isolating allusions, the question of the validity of the terms quotation and allusion in Revelation, and the presence of thematic patterns in the author's choice of Scripture. All this is foundational to the main portion of the work (Ch. III), where a detailed analysis is undertaken to determine the validity of all proposed allusions to Isaiah in the book of Revelation. Of the 72 suggested allusions treated, 40 were judged as certain or virtually certain, 24 were considered as unlikely or doubtful, and 8 were appraised as probable or possible. Those allusions which were accepted received further evaluation to see how and why they were used by John, with special attention given to the tradition-history of the passage used, and the possible interpretative techniques employed. A variety of exegetical and literary devices were uncovered, including the use of catchwords, inclusio, repetition of texts, exploitation of Hebrew parallelism, and the collection of texts around a central theme. Furthermore, John's use of Isaiah is concentrated in basic areas, with clusters of Isaiah texts appearing in specific sections of Revelation. The principal Isaian themes with which he is interested are holy war and the Day of the Lord, oracles against the nations, and salvation prophecies relating to the community of faith and the restored and glorified Jerusalem. It was concluded that on the whole, John's use of Isaiah is not random, and he does not use the OT texts merely as a visionary resource for language, phrases, structural patterns etc. But he consciously carries on the prophecies of his biblical predecessors and invokes their authority. The remnants and results of John's interpretation of Isaiah presuppose exegetical activity and application prior to the vision experience and it is likely that at least some of his intended readers were familiar not only with his theological concerns, but also with his methodological approach.

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The Book of Job has held a central role in defining the project of modernity from the age of Enlightenment until today. The Book of Job: Aesthetics, Ethics and Hermeneutics offers new perspectives on the ways in which Job’s response to disaster has become an aesthetic and ethical touchstone for modern reflections on catastrophic events. This volume begins with an exploration of questions such as the tragic and ironic bent of the Book of Job, Job as mourner, and theJoban body in pain, and ends with a consideration of Joban works by notable writers – from Melville and Kafka, through Joseph Roth, Zach, Levin, and Philip Roth.

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Over twenty-five years in the making, this much-anticipated commentary promises to be the standard study of Proverbs for years to come. Written by eminent Old Testament scholar Bruce Waltke, this two-volume commentary is unquestionably the most comprehensive work on Proverbs available. Grounded in the new literary criticism that has so strengthened biblical interpretation of late, Waltke's commentary on Proverbs demonstrates the profound, ongoing relevance of this Old Testament book for Christian faith and life. A thorough introduction addresses such issues as text and versions, structure, authorship, and theology. The detailed commentary itself explains and elucidates Proverbs as "theological literature." Waltke's highly readable style -- evident even in his original translation of the Hebrew text -- makes his scholarly work accessible to teachers, pastors, Bible students, and general readers alike.

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